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Look Inside Commerce and Colonization in the Ancient Near East

Commerce and Colonization in the Ancient Near East

$113.00 (C)

  • Date Published: January 2013
  • availability: Available
  • format: Hardback
  • isbn: 9780521514170

$ 113.00 (C)
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About the Authors
  • In this analysis of the first colonialisms in history, the eastern roots of the Phoenician colonial system in the first millennium BC are traced and the metropolis of Tyre is established as the final link in a long chain of colonial experiences in the ancient Near East. The author reviews some of the theories and debates about trade and the colonial phenomenon, scrutinises the colonial situations that arose in the East in a context of long-distance interregional trade, and analyses the examples – Egypt, Byblos, Uruk, and Assur – where a metropolis with a mercantile tradition intervenes and acts as intermediary in different interregional exchange circuits. The success of a colonial metropolis is measured by its capacity to integrate dependent and complementary economies in circumstances where there is a strong demand for raw materials by the great powers. In that context, the profits obtained in the colonies thanks to price differentials between one region and another bring us back to the unending debate about the place of the economy in the ancient world and the pertinence of using features from modern economy – such as market, capital, private initiative, laws of supply and demand, and money – to explain the economies of the past.

    • Discusses the importance of Byblos and other centers for the study of Near Eastern trading colonies from the third millennium BC
    • Examines price differences among regions and unequal distribution of resources as the starting point of ancient trade and colonization
    • Presents the trading colony as a characteristic feature of the ancient Near East
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    Product details

    • Date Published: January 2013
    • format: Hardback
    • isbn: 9780521514170
    • length: 424 pages
    • dimensions: 229 x 152 x 24 mm
    • weight: 0.73kg
    • contains: 75 b/w illus. 20 maps
    • availability: Available
  • Table of Contents

    Part I. The Debate Concerning Ancient Economy:
    1. The first great debate: primitivists vs. modernists
    2. Karl Polanyi and his view of ancient economy
    3. Colonialism and cultures in contact: theorisings and critiques
    4. The place of trade in ancient economies
    Part II. Trade and Colonialism in the Near East:
    5. State trade vs. private initiative
    6. Uruk and the first colonialism
    7. Byblos and Egypt: reciprocity and shared ideologies
    8. The Assyrian trading circuit in Anatolia: the metropolis
    9. The Assyrian trading circuit in Anatolia: the colonies
    10. Final thoughts.

  • Author

    Maria Eugenia Aubet, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona
    Maria Eugenia Aubet is Professor of Archaeology at the Universidad Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona. She is the Director of the archaeological excavations in Tyre, Lebanon, and has written several books including The Phoenicians in the West: Politics, Colonies, and Trade and The Phoenician Cemetery of Tyre-Al Bas.

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