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Urbanisation and State Formation in the Ancient Sahara and Beyond

Urbanisation and State Formation in the Ancient Sahara and Beyond

c.$145.00 ( )

Part of Trans-Saharan Archaeology

David J. Mattingly, Martin Sterry, Stefania Merlo, Lucia Mori, Louise Rayne, Muftah Al-Haddad, Anna Lucille Boozer, Pol Trousset, Youssef Bokbot, David N. Edwards, Andrew I. Wilson, Joan Sanmartí, Nabil Kallala, Maria Carme Belarte, Joan Ramon, Francisco José Cantero, Dani López, Marta Portillo, Sílvia Valenzuela, Kevin C. Macdonald, Susan Keech Mcintosh, Carlos Magnavita, Chloé Capel, Sam Nixon, Judith Scheele
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  • Publication planned for: May 2020
  • availability: Not yet published - available from May 2020
  • format: Hardback
  • isbn: 9781108494441

c.$ 145.00 ( )
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  • The themes of sedentarisation, urbanisation and state formation are fundamental ones in the archaeology of many diverse parts of the world but have been little explored in relation to early societies of the Saharan zone. Moreover, the possibility has rarely been considered that the precocious civilisations bordering this vast desert were interconnected by long-range contacts and knowledge networks. The orthodox opinion of many of the key oasis zones within the Sahara is that they were not created before the early medieval period and the Islamic conquest of Mediterranean North Africa. Major claims of this volume are that the ultimate origins of oasis settlements in many parts of the Sahara were considerably earlier, that by the first millennium AD some of these oasis settlements were of a size and complexity to merit the categorisation 'towns' and that a few exceptional examples were focal centres within proto-states or early state-level societies.

    • The state of the field in the study of urbanisation and state formation of the Sahara and neighbouring regions
    • Sets the agenda for future research on sedentarisation, oasis formation, urbanisation and state formation
    • Collates all published historical era radiocarbon dates from the Sahara as well as a wide range of data from a vast geographic zone
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    Product details

    • Publication planned for: May 2020
    • format: Hardback
    • isbn: 9781108494441
    • dimensions: 247 x 174 mm
    • contains: 77 b/w illus. 63 colour illus. 10 tables
    • availability: Not yet published - available from May 2020
  • Table of Contents

    Part I. Introduction:
    1. Introduction to the themes of sedentarisation, urbanisation and state formation in the ancient Sahara and beyond David J. Mattingly and Martin Sterry
    Part II. Oasis Origins in the Sahara: A Region-By-Region Survey:
    2. Garamantian oasis settlements in Fazzan David J. Mattingly, Stefania Merlo, Lucia Mori and Martin Sterry
    3. Pre-Islamic oasis settlements in the eastern Sahara David J. Mattingly, Martin Sterry, Louise Rayne and Muftah Al-Haddad
    4. The urbanisation of Egypt's western desert under Roman rule Anna Lucille Boozer
    5. Pre-Islamic oasis settlements in the northern Sahara David J. Mattingly, Martin Sterry, Muftah Al-Haddad and Pol Trousset
    6. Pre-Islamic oasis settlements in the north-western Sahara Martin Sterry, David J. Mattingly and Youssef Bokbot
    7. Pre-Islamic oasis settlements in the southern Sahara Martin Sterry and David J. Mattingly
    8. Discussion: sedentarisation and urbanisation in the Sahara Martin Sterry and David J. Mattingly
    Part III. Neighbours and Comparanda:
    9. Early states and urban forms in the middle Nile David N. Edwards
    10. Mediterranean urbanisation in North Africa: Greek, Punic and Roman models Andrew I. Wilson
    11. Numidian state formation in the Tunisian High Tell Joan Sanmartí, Nabil Kallala, Maria Carme Belarte, Joan Ramon, Francisco José Cantero, Dani López, Marta Portillo and Sílvia Valenzuela
    12. The origins of urbanisation and structured political power in Morocco: indigenous phenomenon or foreign colonisation? Youssef Bokbot
    13. Architecture and settlement growth on the southern edge of the Sahara: timing and possible implications for interactions with the north Kevin C. Macdonald
    14. Long-distance exchange and urban trajectories in the first millennium AD: case studies from the middle Niger and middle Senegal River valleys Susan Keech Mcintosh
    15. First millennia BC/AD fortified settlements at Lake Chad: implications for the origins of urbanisation and state formation in sub-Saharan Africa Carlos Magnavita
    16. At the dawn of Sijilmasa: new historical focus on the process of emergence of a Saharan state and a caravan city Chloé Capel
    17. The early Islamic trans-Saharan market towns of West Africa Sam Nixon
    18. Urbanisation, inequality and political authority in the Sahara Judith Scheele
    Part IV. Concluding Discussion:
    19. State-formation in the Sahara and beyond David J. Mattingly and Martin Sterry.

  • Editors

    Martin Sterry, University of Durham
    Martin Sterry is Honorary Research Fellow at the University of Durham. His research on the archaeology of the Sahara and North Africa makes particular use of GIS and remote sensing. He has undertaken fieldwork on various projects in Italy, Britain, Libya and most recently southern Morocco, where he is co-director of the Middle Draa Project. He has published many articles on the Libyan Fazzan, Saharan trade, urbanisation and oasis settlements.

    David J. Mattingly, University of Leicester
    David J. Mattingly is Professor of Roman Archaeology at the University of Leicester. He has worked in the Sahara for forty years and is the author of many books and articles related to Saharan archaeology, such as Farming the Desert (2 volumes, 1996), which won the James R. Wiseman book award of the American Institute of Archaeology, and The Archaeology of Fazzan series (4 volumes, 2003–2013). He was the principal investigator of the European Research Council-funded Trans-SAHARA Project (2011–2017) which created the groundwork for this volume, and he is the overall series editor of Trans-Saharan Archaeology, in which this is the third of four projected volumes.

    Contributors

    David J. Mattingly, Martin Sterry, Stefania Merlo, Lucia Mori, Louise Rayne, Muftah Al-Haddad, Anna Lucille Boozer, Pol Trousset, Youssef Bokbot, David N. Edwards, Andrew I. Wilson, Joan Sanmartí, Nabil Kallala, Maria Carme Belarte, Joan Ramon, Francisco José Cantero, Dani López, Marta Portillo, Sílvia Valenzuela, Kevin C. Macdonald, Susan Keech Mcintosh, Carlos Magnavita, Chloé Capel, Sam Nixon, Judith Scheele

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