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Copyright and the Value of Performance, 1770–1911

$99.99 (C)

Part of Theatre and Performance Theory

  • Date Published: September 2018
  • availability: Temporarily unavailable - available from TBC
  • format: Hardback
  • isbn: 9781108425889

$ 99.99 (C)
Hardback

Temporarily unavailable - available from TBC
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  • In the nineteenth century, copyright law expanded to include performances of theatrical and musical works. These laws transformed how people made and consumed performances. Exploring precedent-setting litigation on both sides of the Atlantic, this book traces how courts developed definitions of theater and music to suit new performance rights laws. From Gilbert and Sullivan battling to protect The Mikado to Augustin Daly petitioning to control his spectacular 'railroad scene', artists worked with courts to refine vague legal language into clear, functional theories of drama, music, and performance. Through cases that ensnared figures including Lord Byron, Laura Keene, and Dion Boucicault, this book discovers how the law theorized central aspects of performance including embodiment, affect, audience response, and the relationship between scripts and performances. This history reveals how the advent of performance rights reshaped how we value performance both as an artistic medium and as property.

    • Traces the development of performance rights in Anglo-American copyright law
    • Demonstrates the interdependence of legal theory and artistic debates, focusing on the law's contingency, rather than solely on legal outcomes
    • Explains how copyright reshaped the theater and music industries
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    Product details

    • Date Published: September 2018
    • format: Hardback
    • isbn: 9781108425889
    • length: 290 pages
    • dimensions: 235 x 157 x 20 mm
    • weight: 0.56kg
    • availability: Temporarily unavailable - available from TBC
  • Table of Contents

    Introduction: copyright, commodification, and performance
    1. Performance's valuable propriety, 1770–1833
    2. Ontologies of the performance-commodity, 1833–86
    3. Audiences, actors, and value, 1852–1911
    4. The performance-commodity at work, 1833–1911
    Epilogue: valuing performance today
    Appendix: timeline of major legislation and litigation affecting performance rights.

  • Author

    Derek Miller, Harvard University, Massachusetts
    Derek Miller is John L. Loeb Associate Professor of the Humanities at Harvard University, Massachusetts.

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