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Between Rome and Carthage
Southern Italy during the Second Punic War

$124.00 (C)

  • Date Published: July 2010
  • availability: Available
  • format: Hardback
  • isbn: 9780521516945

$ 124.00 (C)
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  • Hannibal invaded Italy with the hope of raising widespread rebellions among Rome's subordinate allies. Yet even after crushing the Roman army at Cannae, he was only partially successful. Why did some communities decide to side with Carthage and others to side with Rome? This is the fundamental question posed in this book, and consideration is given to the particular political, diplomatic, military and economic factors that influenced individual communities' decisions. Understanding their motivations reveals much, not just about the war itself, but also about Rome's relations with Italy during the prior two centuries of aggressive expansion. The book sheds new light on Roman imperialism in Italy, the nature of Roman hegemony, and the transformation of Roman Italy in the period leading up to the Social War. It is informed throughout by contemporary political science theory and archaeological evidence, and will be required reading for all historians of the Roman Republic.

    • Employs modern political science and models of interstate relations models to shed new light on the ancient sources for the Second Punic War
    • Synthesizes recent archaeological evidence and makes a wide range of regional and site-specific material accessible to readers
    • Fifteen maps provide up-to-date information on the location of ancient sites and the geographic relationship between ancient cities involved in the Second Punic War
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    Reviews & endorsements

    "Fronda’s fresh and modern approach to the [Second Punic] war’s diplomatic arena, which both incorporates material and numismatic evidence alongside written sources and situates events in their historical context, offers much more than its subtitle suggests. Although not structured as a narrative, the book develops a history of southern Italy in a neglected period, c. 350-200 BCE, and contributes much of interest to scholars of Roman history more generally." --Bryn Mawr Classical Review

    "The book makes a significant contribution to the crucial issues of why Hannibal lost, and what his defeat meant for both Rome and Italy."
    -- Dexter Hoyos, New England Classical Journal

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    Product details

    • Date Published: July 2010
    • format: Hardback
    • isbn: 9780521516945
    • length: 404 pages
    • dimensions: 235 x 158 x 25 mm
    • weight: 0.79kg
    • contains: 15 maps
    • availability: Available
  • Table of Contents

    1. Introduction
    2. Apulia
    3. Campania
    4. Bruttium and Western Magna Graecia
    5. Southern Lucania and Eastern Magna Graecia
    6. The Roman re-conquest of Southern Italy
    7. Conclusions
    Appendix A. The war in Samnium, 217–209
    Appendix B. Chronology of events in Bruttium, 215
    Appendix C. Chronology of events from the defection of Taras through the defection of Thurii, 213–212
    Appendix D. Defection of the Southern Lucanians, 212.

  • Author

    Michael P. Fronda, McGill University, Montréal
    Michael P. Fronda is Assistant Professor in the Department of History and Classical Studies, McGill University. He has published a number of articles on topics in ancient history and has contributed to D. Hoyos (ed.), The Blackwell Companion to the Punic Wars.

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