Skip to content
Register Sign in Wishlist

Language and Society in the Greek and Roman Worlds

$32.99 (P)

Part of Key Themes in Ancient History

  • Date Published: August 2015
  • availability: In stock
  • format: Paperback
  • isbn: 9780521140669

$ 32.99 (P)
Paperback

Add to cart Add to wishlist

Other available formats:
Hardback, eBook


Looking for an examination copy?

If you are interested in the title for your course we can consider offering an examination copy. To register your interest please contact collegesales@cambridge.org providing details of the course you are teaching.

Description
Product filter button
Description
Contents
Resources
Courses
About the Authors
  • Texts written in Latin, Greek and other languages provide ancient historians with their primary evidence, but the role of language as a source for understanding the ancient world is often overlooked. Language played a key role in state-formation and the spread of Christianity, the construction of ethnicity, and negotiating positions of social status and group membership. Language could reinforce social norms and shed light on taboos. This book presents an accessible account of ways in which linguistic evidence can illuminate topics such as imperialism, ethnicity, social mobility, religion, gender and sexuality in the ancient world, without assuming the reader has any knowledge of Greek or Latin, or of linguistic jargon. It describes the rise of Greek and Latin at the expense of other languages spoken around the Mediterranean and details the social meanings of different styles, and the attitudes of ancient speakers towards linguistic differences.

    • Presents ancient languages in the context of ancient history, making linguistic discoveries and insights available to ancient historians
    • Linguistic jargon is avoided: readers can understand the material without having a previous understanding of linguistics
    • Accessible to readers from many disciplines such as classics, theology, medieval history and Near Eastern studies
    Read more

    Reviews & endorsements

    "… this is a work with a clear aim and a lot of coherence; it will serve its purpose as an excellent introduction to a vast subject."
    Staffan Wahlgren, Bryn Mawr Classical Review

    Customer reviews

    Not yet reviewed

    Be the first to review

    Review was not posted due to profanity

    ×

    , create a review

    (If you're not , sign out)

    Please enter the right captcha value
    Please enter a star rating.
    Your review must be a minimum of 12 words.

    How do you rate this item?

    ×

    Product details

    • Date Published: August 2015
    • format: Paperback
    • isbn: 9780521140669
    • length: 218 pages
    • dimensions: 228 x 152 x 11 mm
    • weight: 0.36kg
    • contains: 9 b/w illus. 3 tables
    • availability: In stock
  • Table of Contents

    1. The linguistic ecology of the Mediterranean
    2. States of languages / languages of states
    3. Language and identity
    4. Language variation
    5. Language, gender, sexuality
    6. The languages of Christianity
    Conclusion: dead languages?
    Bibliographic essay.

  • Author

    James Clackson, University of Cambridge
    James Clackson is a recognised world authority on the Indo-European language family. His research has focused on tracking the history and relationships of the ancient languages of the Mediterranean basin and Europe, ranging from Armenian to Volscian. His previous books include The Linguistic Relationship between Armenian and Greek (1994), Indo-European Linguistics (2007), The Blackwell History of the Latin Language (with G. Horrocks, 2007) and The Blackwell Companion to the Latin Language (2011). He is also joint editor of the world's oldest journal in continuous publication devoted to languages and linguistics, The Transactions of the Philological Society.

Sign In

Please sign in to access your account

Cancel

Not already registered? Create an account now. ×

Sorry, this resource is locked

Please register or sign in to request access. If you are having problems accessing these resources please email lecturers@cambridge.org

Register Sign in
Please note that this file is password protected. You will be asked to input your password on the next screen.

» Proceed

You are now leaving the Cambridge University Press website. Your eBook purchase and download will be completed by our partner www.ebooks.com. Please see the permission section of the www.ebooks.com catalogue page for details of the print & copy limits on our eBooks.

Continue ×

Continue ×

Continue ×

Find content that relates to you

Join us online

This site uses cookies to improve your experience. Read more Close

Are you sure you want to delete your account?

This cannot be undone.

Cancel

Thank you for your feedback which will help us improve our service.

If you requested a response, we will make sure to get back to you shortly.

×
Please fill in the required fields in your feedback submission.
×