Skip to content

Due to scheduled maintenance, online ordering, in regions where offered, will not be available on this site from 08:00 until noon GMT on Sunday 17th February. We apologise for the inconvenience.

Cart

Your Cart

×

You have 0 items in your cart.

Register Sign in Wishlist
Ancient Greek Portrait Sculpture

Ancient Greek Portrait Sculpture
Contexts, Subjects, and Styles

$103.00 (C)

  • Date Published: April 2006
  • availability: In stock
  • format: Hardback
  • isbn: 9780521854986

$ 103.00 (C)
Hardback

Add to cart Add to wishlist

Other available formats:
Paperback


Looking for an examination copy?

If you are interested in the title for your course we can consider offering an examination copy. To register your interest please contact collegesales@cambridge.org providing details of the course you are teaching.

Description
Product filter button
Description
Contents
Resources
Courses
About the Authors
  • This book offers a new approach to the history of Greek portraiture by focusing on portraits without names. Sheila Dillon considers the few original bronze and marble portrait statues preserved from the Classical and Hellenistic periods together with the large number of Greek portraits known only through Roman copies. This study calls into question two basic tenets of Greek portraiture: first, that it was only in the late Hellenistic period, under Roman influence, that Greek portraits exhibited a wide range of styles, including descriptive realism; and second, that in most cases, one can easily tell a subject's public role from the visual traits used in this portrait. The sculptures studied here instead show that the proliferation of portrait styles takes place much earlier, in the late Classical period, and that the identity expressed by these portraits is much more complex and layered than has previously been realized.

    • Focuses on a series of images that have previously been ignored, offering a new approach by looking at portraits without names
    • Comprehensively illustrated
    • Presents evidence leading to conclusions undermining the two basic tenets of Greek portraiture
    Read more

    Reviews & endorsements

    "A great virtue of Dillon's study is her attention to bot the Greek setting of the original images and the display of busts and herms, and more rarely full statues of these past men of action or thought in Roman villas and gardens."
    -Barbara Tsakirgis, Vanderbilt University

    "Portrait Sculpture. Context, Subjects, and Styles... is a great book. ...[I]t is hard to do justice to the many issues that it raises. All the more reason, I think, to use the volume in your next seminar on Greek and Roman portraiture."
    -Peter Schultz, Concordia College, Bryn Mawr Classical Review

    See more reviews

    Customer reviews

    Not yet reviewed

    Be the first to review

    Review was not posted due to profanity

    ×

    , create a review

    (If you're not , sign out)

    Please enter the right captcha value
    Please enter a star rating.
    Your review must be a minimum of 12 words.

    How do you rate this item?

    ×

    Product details

    • Date Published: April 2006
    • format: Hardback
    • isbn: 9780521854986
    • length: 238 pages
    • dimensions: 285 x 222 x 19 mm
    • weight: 0.922kg
    • contains: 171 b/w illus.
    • availability: In stock
  • Table of Contents

    1. Facing up to anonymity
    2. Making portraits of the Greeks
    3. Displaying portraits of the Greeks
    4. The appearance of Greek portraits
    5. Greek portraits in practice.

  • Author

    Sheila Dillon, Duke University, North Carolina
    Sheila Dillon is Associate Professor in the Department of Art, Art History and Visual Studies at Duke University, with a secondary appointment in the Department of Classical Studies. She is the author of The Female Portrait Statue in the Greek World (2010) and co-editor of A Companion to Women in the Ancient World (2012).

Sign In

Please sign in to access your account

Cancel

Not already registered? Create an account now. ×

Sorry, this resource is locked

Please register or sign in to request access. If you are having problems accessing these resources please email lecturers@cambridge.org

Register Sign in
Please note that this file is password protected. You will be asked to input your password on the next screen.

» Proceed

You are now leaving the Cambridge University Press website. Your eBook purchase and download will be completed by our partner www.ebooks.com. Please see the permission section of the www.ebooks.com catalogue page for details of the print & copy limits on our eBooks.

Continue ×

Continue ×

Continue ×

Find content that relates to you

This site uses cookies to improve your experience. Read more Close

Are you sure you want to delete your account?

This cannot be undone.

Cancel

Thank you for your feedback which will help us improve our service.

If you requested a response, we will make sure to get back to you shortly.

×
Please fill in the required fields in your feedback submission.
×