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The New Cambridge History of American Foreign Relations

The New Cambridge History of American Foreign Relations
4 Volume Set

$216.00 (P)

Part of The New Cambridge History of American Foreign Relations

  • Date Published: June 2013
  • availability: In stock
  • format: Multiple copy pack
  • isbn: 9781107031838

$ 216.00 (P)
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About the Authors
  • Since their first publication, the four volumes of the Cambridge History of American Foreign Relations have served as the definitive source for the topic, from the colonial period to the Cold War. The first volume proposes that the British North American colonists' preexisting desire for expansion, security, and prosperity is both the essence of American foreign relations and the root cause for the creation of the United States. The second volume describes the dynamics of United States foreign policy from 1865 to 1913, the era when the United States became one of the four great world powers and the world's greatest economic power. The third volume describes how the United States became a global power – economically, culturally, and militarily – during the period from 1913 to 1945, from the inception of Woodrow Wilson's presidency to the end of the Second World War. The revised and expanded fourth volume explores the conditions in the international system at the end of World War II, the American determination to provide leadership, and the security dilemma each superpower posed for the other, while incorporating recent scholarship and revelations, and carrying the narrative into the Barack Obama's administration.

    • Incomparable in their depth, scope and insight, these volumes explore America's past via the unique perspective of America's connections with the rest of the world
    • Organized chronologically from the country's founding to the present, each of the four volumes is written by a leading historian
    • With the Cold War nearly a generation behind us and new world orders emerging, The New Cambridge History of American Foreign Relations is a valuable tool for understanding the roots of America's past and present role in the world
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    Product details

    • Date Published: June 2013
    • format: Multiple copy pack
    • isbn: 9781107031838
    • dimensions: 315 x 250 x 148 mm
    • weight: 2.6kg
    • contains: 7 maps
    • availability: In stock
  • Table of Contents

    Volume 1. Dimensions of the Early American Empire, 1754–1865:
    1. Origins of the American empire and union
    2. A perilous union, 1783–96
    3. The 'Empire of Liberty' on land and sea
    4. Towards hemispheric superiority
    5. Freedom's empire
    6. Expansionist vistas: Canada, Oregon, California, and Texas
    7. Bulling Britain, conquering Mexico, claiming the canal
    8. Disunion
    9. The imperial crisis, 1861–5. Volume 2. The American Search for Opportunity, 1865–1913:
    1. Springboards and strategies
    2. The second industrial revolution at home and abroad
    3. Race for empire
    4. 'America will take this continent in hand along'
    5. Crossing the oceans
    6. 1893–6: chaos and crises
    7. The empire of 1898 – and beyond
    8. Pacific empire – and upheaval
    9. Theodore Roosevelt: conservative as revolutionary
    10. William Howard Taft and the age of revolution
    Conclusion:
    11. The 1865–1913 era restated. Volume 3. The Globalizing of America, 1913–1945:
    1. The age of European domination
    2. The Great War and American neutrality
    3. The United States at war
    4. The Versailles peace
    5. The 1920s: the security aspect
    6. The 1920s: the economic aspect
    7. The 1920s: the cultural aspect
    8. The collapse of international order
    9. Totalitarianism and the survival of democracy
    10. The emergence of geopolitics
    11. The road to Pearl Harbor
    12. The global conflict. Volume 4. Challenges to American Primacy, 1945 to the Present: Part I. The Cold War:
    1. At war's end: visions of a new world order
    2. Origins of the Cold War
    3. The Korean War and its consequences
    4. New leaders and new arenas in the Cold War
    5. Crisis revolution
    6. America's longest war
    7. The rise and fall of détente
    8. In God's country
    9. America and the world, 1945–91
    Part II. After the Cold War:
    10. The new world order
    11. The 'war' against terrorism.

  • Authors

    William Earl Weeks, San Diego State University
    William Earl Weeks is Lecturer in History at San Diego State University. He is the author of John Quincy Adams and American Global Empire (1992) and Building the Continental Empire, 1815–1861, and co-editor of American Foreign Relations since 1600: A Guide to the Literature (2003).

    Walter LaFeber, Cornell University
    Walter LaFeber is Andrew Tisch and James Tisch Distinguished University Professor Emeritus in the Department of History at Cornell University. He is the author of several books, including America, Russia, and the Cold War, 1945–2006 (10th edition, 2007), The New Empire: An Interpretation of American Expansion, 1865–1898 (25th anniversary edition, 1998) and The Clash: U.S.-Japan Relations Throughout History (1997).

    Akira Iriye, Harvard University
    Akira Iriye is Charles Warren Professor of American History Emeritus at Harvard University. He is the author of several books, including Global Community: The Role of International Organizations in the Making of the Contemporary World (2002), Cultural Imperialism and World Order (1998) and China and Japan in the Global Setting (1993).

    Warren I. Cohen, University of Maryland, Baltimore
    Warren I. Cohen is University Distinguished Professor Emeritus at Michigan State University, Distinguished University Professor Emeritus at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, and Senior Scholar at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars. Professor Cohen has published nineteen books, the best known of which is America's Response to China, 5th edition (2010).

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