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Individuals, Families, and Communities in Europe, 1200–1800

Individuals, Families, and Communities in Europe, 1200–1800
The Urban Foundations of Western Society

$42.99 (P)

Part of Cambridge Studies in Population, Economy and Society in Past Time

  • Date Published: September 2003
  • availability: Available
  • format: Paperback
  • isbn: 9780521645416

$ 42.99 (P)
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About the Authors
  • Katherine Lynch discusses the role of the family in society from the late Middle Ages to the industrial period. She argues that in western Europe an ongoing, and recognizably western pattern of relationships among individuals, their families, and communities emerged in the late medieval period. Tracing the pattern through the nineteenth century, this study explores the family's function as an organization on the boundary between public and private life, rather than as part of a "private sphere", and how this phenomenon has been influenced by political, religious and demographic factors.

    • Broad range of appeal, covering history, anthropology, demography and political theory
    • Written in a straight-forward, accessible style
    • Several topics central to current historical debates
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    Reviews & endorsements

    "This is an informative and thought-provoking book that will certainly shape subsequent discussions of the origins of civic consciousness and the emergence of democrary in Western Europe."
    - Renaissance Quarterly

    "...[this book] has a number of strengths. For newcomers to urban or family history during the medieval and early modern periods, it offers a succinct overview of a vast body of literature. For specialists, Lynch's exploration of the relationship between poor relief, the family, and civic order is fascinating. And for the period prior to the Reformation, Lynch fruitfully compares the experience of women in northern and southern Europe, and demonstrates the importance of church institutions to the foundation and maintenance of secular communities."
    - H-Women, Samuel S. Thomas, Department of History, Wittenberg University

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    Product details

    • Date Published: September 2003
    • format: Paperback
    • isbn: 9780521645416
    • length: 268 pages
    • dimensions: 229 x 152 x 15 mm
    • weight: 0.4kg
    • contains: 10 b/w illus. 3 maps 4 tables
    • availability: Available
  • Table of Contents

    Preface and acknowledgements
    Introduction
    1. Fundamental features of European urban settings
    2. Church, family and bonds of spiritual kinship
    3. Charity, poor relief and the family in religious and civic communities
    4. Individuals, families and communities in urban Europe of the Protestant and Catholic reformations
    5. Constructing an 'Imagined Community': poor relief and the family during the French Revolution
    Conclusion
    Bibliography.

  • Author

    Katherine A. Lynch, Carnegie Mellon University, Pennsylvania
    Katherine Lynch is Professor of History at Carnegie Mellon University, Pennsylvania. Her previous publications include Family, Class, and Ideology in Early Industrial France: Social Policy and the Working-Class Family, 1825–1848 (1988) and Sources and Methods of Historical Demography (1982).

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