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Return to Kahiki
Native Hawaiians in Oceania

$49.99 (C)

Part of Studies in North American Indian History

  • Date Published: January 2018
  • availability: In stock
  • format: Hardback
  • isbn: 9781107195899

$ 49.99 (C)
Hardback

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About the Authors
  • Between 1850 and 1907, Native Hawaiians sought to develop relationships with other Pacific Islanders, reflecting how they viewed not only themselves as a people but their wider connections to Oceania and the globe. Kealani Cook analyzes the relatively little known experiences of Native Hawaiian missionaries, diplomats, and travelers, shedding valuable light on the rich but understudied accounts of Hawaiians outside of Hawaiʻi. Native Hawaiian views of other islanders typically corresponded with their particular views and experiences of the Native Hawaiian past. The more positive their outlook, the more likely they were to seek cross-cultural connections. This is an important intervention in the growing field of Pacific and Oceanic history and the study of native peoples of the Americas, where books on indigenous Hawaiians are few and far between. Cook returns the study of Hawai'i to a central place in the history of cultural change in the Pacific.

    • Focuses on relationships between Native Hawaiians and other Oceanic peoples, rather than between Pacific Islanders and empires
    • Unlike most books on Hawaiʻi, this book restores a sense of continuity in Hawaiian and Native Hawaiian history before and after annexation by America
    • Portrays Native Hawaiians in roles commonly envisioned as the domain of European and American imperial actors: missionaries, diplomats, tourists, and travel writers
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    Reviews & endorsements

    'With this remarkable book, Kealani Cook dramatically expands our understanding of the Native Hawaiian and Oceanic past and speaks powerfully to the Pacific present. Meticulously researched and yet sweeping in its scale, Return to Kahiki reveals the often complex, sometimes contradictory, and always fraught way that Hawaiians thought about their place in the Pacific and engaged with other Pacific Islanders.' David A. Chang, University of Minnesota

    'In this careful study, Kealani Cook brings to life the whanaungatanga (kinship, relationship) of our Oceanic brothers and sisters. Invoking historical Kanaka projects that retrace centuries-old Oceanic connections in new ways, and for new purpose, he reminds the twenty-first century reader of the lived relationships of our various island kōrero, traditions, and peoples.' Aroha Harris, University of Auckland

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    Product details

    • Date Published: January 2018
    • format: Hardback
    • isbn: 9781107195899
    • length: 270 pages
    • dimensions: 237 x 160 x 20 mm
    • weight: 0.5kg
    • availability: In stock
  • Table of Contents

    Introduction: Mai Kahiki Mai: out from Kahiki
    1. Ke Ao a me Ka Pō: post-millennial thought and Kanaka Foreign Mission work
    2. Among the wild dogs: negotiating the boundaries of Hawaiian Christianity
    3. A kindred people: Hawaiian diplomacy in Sāmoa, 1887
    4. The Hawaiian model: imagining the future of Oceania
    5. 'There is nothing that separates us': John T. Baker and the Pan-Oceanic Lāhui
    6. Makaʻāinana or servants of the dollar? Oceanic and capialist values
    Conclusion: the return to Kahiki.

  • Author

    Kealani Cook, University of Hawai'i, West O'ahu
    Kealani Cook is an Assistant Professor at the University of Hawaiʻi, West Oʻahu. He is a Kānaka Maoli/Native Hawaiian raised in Waimea, Hawaiʻi Island.

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