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Women, Writing and the Public Sphere, 1700–1830

Women, Writing and the Public Sphere, 1700–1830

$99.99 (C)

Elizabeth Eger, Charlotte Grant, Clíona Ó'Gallchoir, Penny Warburton, Markman Ellis, Caroline Gonda, Charlotte Grant, Kate Davies, Gary Kelly, Susan Wiseman, Nigel Leask, Sylvana Tomaselli, Mary Jacobus
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  • Date Published: February 2001
  • availability: Available
  • format: Hardback
  • isbn: 9780521771061

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About the Authors
  • In this book, an international team of specialists examines the dynamic relation between women and the public sphere between 1700 and 1830. Drawing on literary and visual evidence, contributors highlight the range of women's cultural activity during the period, from historiography, publishing and translation to philosophical and political writing. Women, Writing and the Public Sphere examines the history of the public spaces women occupied, raising questions of scandal and display, improvement, virtue and morality in the context of the production and consumption of culture by women in eighteenth-century England.

    • This is an interdisciplinary volume whose broad appeal should reach eighteenth-century specialists as well as women's studies specialists and art historians
    • The volume includes visual as well as literary evidence
    • The volume focuses on literary activities which have not always received much attention, such as history writing, publishing and translation and political writing
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    Reviews & endorsements

    "Nuanced and expertly argued, this collection clearly makes an important contribution to the scholarship of separate spheres." Albion

    "The twelve essays included in Women, Writing and the Public Sphere represent a remarkable range of research and recovery work... illuminating and scrupulously researched..." Jill Heyd-Stevenson, Wordsworth Circle

    "Fascinating." Studies in English Literature

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    Product details

    • Date Published: February 2001
    • format: Hardback
    • isbn: 9780521771061
    • length: 336 pages
    • dimensions: 236 x 161 x 26 mm
    • weight: 0.575kg
    • contains: 14 b/w illus.
    • availability: Available
  • Table of Contents

    List of illustrators
    List of contributors
    Preface and acknowledgements
    Introduction: women, writing and representation Elizabeth Eger, Charlotte Grant, Clíona Ó'Gallchoir and Penny Warburton
    Part I. Women in the Public Eye:
    1. Coffee-women, The Spectator and the public sphere in the early eighteenth century Markman Ellis
    2. Misses, murderesses and magdalens: women in the public eye Caroline Gonda
    Part II. Consuming Arts:
    3. The choice of Hercules: the polite arts and 'female excellence' in eighteenth-century London Charlotte Grant
    4. Representing culture: The Nine Living Muses of Great Britain (1779) Elizabeth Eger
    5. A moral purchase: femininity, commerce and abolition, 1788–1792 Kate Davies
    Part III. Learned Ladies: From Bluestockings to Cosmopolitan Intellectuals:
    6. Bluestocking feminism Gary Kelly
    7. Catharine Macaulay: history, republicanism and the public sphere Susan Wiseman
    8. Gender, nation and revolution: Maria Edgeworth and Stéphanie-Félicité de Genlis Clíona Ó Gallchoir
    9. Salons, Alps and Cordilleras: Helen Maria Williams, Alex von Humboldt and the discourse of Romantic travel Nigel Leask
    Part IV. The Female Subject:
    10. The most public sphere of all: the family Sylvana Tomaselli
    11. Theorising public opinion: Elizabeth Hamilton's model of self, sympathy and society Penny Warburton
    12. Intimate connections: scandalous memoirs and epistolary indiscretion Mary Jacobus
    Bibliography
    Index.

  • Editors

    Elizabeth Eger, University of Liverpool
    Elizabeth Eger is a Research Fellow at the Eighteenth-Century Centre at Warwick University. She is the editor of the Selected Works of Elizabeth Montagu (1999) and a contributor to Women's Poetry in the Enlightenment (1999) and The Cambridge Guide to Women's Literature.

    Charlotte Grant, Jesus College, Cambridge
    Charlotte Grant is Fellow and Director of Studies in English at Jesus College, Cambridge. She writes and teaches in the area of Eighteenth Century Studies.

    Clíona Ó Gallchoir, University College Cork
    Cliona O Gallchoir is a Lecturer in the department of English as University College Cork. She is co-editor with Susan Manly of Volume 9 of Novels and Selected Works of Maria Edgeworth.

    Penny Warburton
    Penny Warbuton has worked as a book reviewer, archivist and university teacher. She is currently finalising her doctoral thesis Women Writing on Economics: Aesthetics, Writing and the Economy, 1760-1833

    Contributors

    Elizabeth Eger, Charlotte Grant, Clíona Ó'Gallchoir, Penny Warburton, Markman Ellis, Caroline Gonda, Charlotte Grant, Kate Davies, Gary Kelly, Susan Wiseman, Nigel Leask, Sylvana Tomaselli, Mary Jacobus

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