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The Cambridge History of the Graphic Novel

$175.00 (R)

Jan Baetens, Hugo Frey, Stephen E. Tabachnick, Denis Mellier, Daniel Stein, Lukas Etter, Barbara Postema, Dan Byrne-Smith, Christopher Pizzino, Gavin Parkinson, Jean-Paul Gabilliet, Paul Williams, Michael A. Chaney, Erin McGlothlin, Christopher Murray, Benjamin Noys, Fabrice Leroy, Susan Kirtley, Justin Hall, Frederick Luis Aldama, Simon Grennan, Joe Sutliff Sanders, Ken Parille, Randy Duncan, Matthew J. Smith, Ann Miller, Chris Reyns, Houssem Lazreg, Bart Beaty, Andrew J. Kunka, Karin Kukkonen, Darren Harris-Fain, Martha Kuhlman, Daniel Morris, Matthew P. McAllister, Stephanie Orme, Brannon Costello, Benoît Crucifix, Björn-Olav Dozo, David M. Ball
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  • Date Published: July 2018
  • availability: Available
  • format: Hardback
  • isbn: 9781107171411

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About the Authors
  • The Cambridge History of the Graphic Novel provides the complete history of the graphic novel from its origins in the nineteenth century to its rise and startling success in the twentieth and twenty-first century. It includes original discussion on the current state of the graphic novel and analyzes how American, European, Middle Eastern, and Japanese renditions have shaped the field. Thirty-five leading scholars and historians unpack both forgotten trajectories as well as the famous key episodes, and explain how comics transitioned from being marketed as children's entertainment. Essays address the masters of the form, including Art Spiegelman, Alan Moore, and Marjane Satrapi, and reflect on their publishing history as well as their social and political effects. This ambitious history offers an extensive, detailed and expansive scholarly account of the graphic novel, and will be a key resource for scholars and students.

    • Presents the first in-depth complete history of the graphic novel from its early foundations to its emergence and current success
    • Opens up relevant new research fields to date which are not yet fully understood: e.g. wordless graphic novels, drawn novels, beat-pop pin up art, e-graphic novels, novels inspired by graphic novels
    • Contains original and informed critical readings of major creative forces in the field including: Jules Feiffer, Robert Crumb, Art Spiegelman, Chris Ware, Marjane Satrapi, Alison Bechdel, Alan Moore and Neil Gaiman among others
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    Reviews & endorsements

    '… undoubtedly one of the great books of the year is [The] Cambridge History of the Graphic Novel (CUP, £125), a fabulously learned volume containing essays on everything from Little Nemo and The Silver Surfer to punk comics, Joe Sacco, LGBTQ comics and 'E-Graphic Novels'.' Tim Martin, The Spectator

    '… an important addition to the scholarship on graphic literature, this volume will immediately be a foundational resource for all serious students of the genre. Essential. Upper-division undergraduates through faculty and professionals ; general readers.' M. F. McClure, Choice

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    Product details

    • Date Published: July 2018
    • format: Hardback
    • isbn: 9781107171411
    • length: 690 pages
    • dimensions: 235 x 159 x 38 mm
    • weight: 1.4kg
    • availability: Available
  • Table of Contents

    1. Introduction Jan Baetens, Hugo Frey and Stephen E. Tabachnick
    Part I:
    2. The origins of adult graphic narratives: graphic literature and the novel, from Laurence Sterne to Gustave Doré (1760–1851) Denis Mellier
    3. Long-length serials in the Golden Age of comic strips: production and reception Daniel Stein and Lukas Etter
    4. Long length wordless books: Frans Masereel, Milt Gross, Lynd Ward, and beyond Barbara Postema
    5. The postwar 'drawn novel' Jan Baetens
    6. Harvey Kurtzman and the influence of Mad magazine Dan Byrne-Smith
    7. When realism met romance: the negative zone of Marvel's Silver Age Christopher Pizzino
    8. Beat-era literature and the graphic novel Hugo Frey
    9. Henry Darger, comics and the graphic novel: contexts and appropriations Gavin Parkinson
    10. Underground comix and the invention of autobiography, history and reportage Jean-Paul Gabilliet
    11. Jules Feiffer – creative and intellectual ally of the graphic novel (and of other critical/editorial voices) Paul Williams
    Part II:
    12. Will Eisner and the making of a contract with God Michael A. Chaney
    13. Art Spiegelman's autobiographical practice from Maus to MetaMaus Erin McGlothlin
    14. Alan Moore: the making of a graphic novelist Christopher Murray
    15. No future: punk and the underground graphic novel Benjamin Noys
    16. European literary and genre fiction: the (À Suivre) magazine and the 'adventure' and 'science fiction' traditions (Pratt, Tardi, Moebius) Fabrice Leroy
    17. 'A word to you feminist women': the parallel legacies of feminism and underground comics Susan Kirtley
    18. The secret origins of LBGTQ graphic novels Justin Hall
    19. US creators of color and the post-underground graphic narrative renaissance Frederick Luis Aldama
    20. The influence of Manga on the graphic novel Simon Grennan
    21. Sandman, the ephemeral, and the permanent Joe Sutliff Sanders
    22. 'To elevate every experience into something artistic and exciting': Daniel Clowes's Ghost World Ken Parille
    23. From an informed fan culture to an academic field Randy Duncan and Matthew J. Smith
    Part III. 24. Joe Sacco, graphic novelist as political journalist Ann Miller
    25. The discovery of Marjane Satrapi and the translation of works from and about the Middle East Chris Reyns and Houssem Lazreg
    26. Chris Oliveros, drawn and quarterly, and the expanded definition of the graphic novel Bart Beaty
    27. The Jewish graphic novel Stephen E. Tabachnick
    28. Crime genre fiction in the graphic novel Andrew J. Kunka
    29. Genre fiction in the graphic novel: the case of science fiction Karin Kukkonen
    30. The superhero graphic novel Darren Harris-Fain
    31. Reinvention of the form: Chris Ware and experimentalism after Raw Martha Kuhlman
    32. Convergence cultures: modern and contemporary poetry and the graphic novel Daniel Morris
    33. Cinema's discovery of the graphic novel: mainstream and independent adaptation Matthew P. McAllister and Stephanie Orme
    34. The novel and the graphic novel Brannon Costello
    35. E-graphic novels Benoît Crucifix and Björn-Olav Dozo
    36. World literature David M. Ball
    Bibliography
    Index.

  • Editors

    Jan Baetens, University of Leuven
    Jan Baetens is the co-author, with Hugo Frey, of The Graphic Novel. An Introduction (Cambridge, 2015). He has written various books (in French) on comics and graphic novels, among which is Hergé écrivain (2006). A specialist of the photo novel and the film photo novel, he has also widely published on film and literature (an English translation of his book Novelization is forthcoming). He is the founding editor of the journal Image and Narrative, which is one of the leading journals in the field.

    Hugo Frey, University of Chichester
    Hugo Frey is the co-author, with Jan Baetens, of The Graphic Novel. An Introduction (Cambridge, 2015). He is the author of two original studies of the history of modern French cinema, Louis Malle (2004) and Nationalism and the Cinema in France (2014). He is Editor for the series European Comics and Graphic Novels and he has also contributed to the series on Science Fiction, Frontiers of the Imagination. At the University of Chichester, he is Chair in Cultural and Visual History and serves as Head of Department of English, Creative Writing, History and Politics. He has also contributed as an Inspirational Lecturer for The Prince's Teaching Institute (PTI), London.

    Stephen E. Tabachnick, University of Memphis
    Stephen E. Tabachnick has taught the graphic novel at the university level for more than twenty years, and is the editor of Teaching the Graphic Novel (2009); (co-editor Esther Saltzman) Drawn from the Classics: Graphic Adaptations of Literary Texts (2015); The Cambridge Companion to the Graphic Novel (Cambridge, 2017); and author of The Quest for Jewish Belief and Identity in the Graphic Novel (2014). He has written or edited several books about Charles M. Doughty, T. E. Lawrence, Harold Pinter, and Rex Warner.

    Contributors

    Jan Baetens, Hugo Frey, Stephen E. Tabachnick, Denis Mellier, Daniel Stein, Lukas Etter, Barbara Postema, Dan Byrne-Smith, Christopher Pizzino, Gavin Parkinson, Jean-Paul Gabilliet, Paul Williams, Michael A. Chaney, Erin McGlothlin, Christopher Murray, Benjamin Noys, Fabrice Leroy, Susan Kirtley, Justin Hall, Frederick Luis Aldama, Simon Grennan, Joe Sutliff Sanders, Ken Parille, Randy Duncan, Matthew J. Smith, Ann Miller, Chris Reyns, Houssem Lazreg, Bart Beaty, Andrew J. Kunka, Karin Kukkonen, Darren Harris-Fain, Martha Kuhlman, Daniel Morris, Matthew P. McAllister, Stephanie Orme, Brannon Costello, Benoît Crucifix, Björn-Olav Dozo, David M. Ball

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