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Shakespeare and Early Modern Religion

$29.99 (C)

David Loewenstein, Michael Witmore, David Bevington, Peter Marshall, Felicity Heal, Alison Shell, Beatrice Groves, Peter Lake, Adrian Streete, Ewan Fernie, Richard McCoy, Paul Stevens, Michael Davies, Matthew Dimmock, Brian Cummings
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  • Date Published: October 2018
  • availability: Available
  • format: Paperback
  • isbn: 9781108733663

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About the Authors
  • Written by an international team of literary scholars and historians, this collaborative volume illuminates the diversity of early modern religious beliefs and practices in Shakespeare's England, and considers how religious culture is imaginatively reanimated in Shakespeare's plays. Fourteen new essays explore the creative ways Shakespeare engaged with the multifaceted dimensions of Protestantism, Catholicism, non-Christian religions including Judaism and Islam, and secular perspectives, considering plays such as Hamlet, Julius Caesar, King John, King Lear, Macbeth, Measure for Measure, A Midsummer Night's Dream and The Winter's Tale. The collection is of great interest to readers of Shakespeare studies, early modern literature, religious studies, and early modern history.

    • Offers interdisciplinary perspectives on Shakespeare and early modern religion from both literary scholars and historians, appealing to a broad range of readers
    • Illuminates the ways in which Shakespeare's plays represent a wide variety of religious beliefs and practices, also revealing a dynamic interaction between religious and secular issues in the plays
    • Connects religious issues in Shakespeare's plays with political and national ones, illuminating religious belief, politics and national identity in early modern England
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    Reviews & endorsements

    'Full of gems, this collection provides a highly productive juxtaposition of historical and literary scholarship.' Thomas Fulton, Renaissance Quarterly

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    Product details

    • Date Published: October 2018
    • format: Paperback
    • isbn: 9781108733663
    • length: 329 pages
    • dimensions: 229 x 152 x 18 mm
    • weight: 0.444kg
    • contains: 1 b/w illus.
    • availability: Available
  • Table of Contents

    Introduction David Loewenstein and Michael Witmore
    Part I. Revisiting Religious Contexts in Shakespeare's England:
    1. The debate about Shakespeare and religion David Bevington
    2. Choosing sides and talking religion in Shakespeare's England Peter Marshall
    3. Experiencing religion in London: diversity and choice in Shakespeare's metropolis Felicity Heal
    Part II. Representing Religious Beliefs and Diversity in the Plays:
    4. Delusion in A Midsummer Night's Dream Alison Shell
    5. The siege of Jerusalem and subversive rhetoric in King John Beatrice Groves
    6. Shakespeare's Julius Caesar and the search for a usable (Christian?) past Peter Lake
    7. Lucretius, Calvin, and natural law in Measure for Measure Adrian Streete
    8. Agnostic Shakespeare?: the God-less world of King Lear David Loewenstein
    9. 'Another Golgotha' Ewan Fernie
    10. Shakespeare and wisdom literature Michael Witmore
    11. Awakening faith in The Winter's Tale Richard McCoy
    12. Hamlet, Henry VIII, and the question of religion: a post-secular perspective Paul Stevens
    13. Converting Henry: truth, history, and historical faith in Henry VIII Michael Davies
    14. Shakespeare's non-Christian religions Matthew Dimmock
    Afterword Brian Cummings.

  • Editors

    David Loewenstein, Pennsylvania State University
    David Loewenstein is Edwin Erle Sparks Professor of English and the Humanities at Pennsylvania State University. He is the editor and author of many publications, including John Milton, Prose: Major Writings on Liberty, Politics, Religion, and Education (2013), Treacherous Faith: The Specter of Heresy in Early Modern English Literature and Culture (2013), The Cambridge History of Early Modern English Literature (coeditor, Cambridge, 2002), and Representing Revolution in Milton and his Contemporaries: Religion, Politics, and Polemics in Radical Puritanism (Cambridge, 2001) which won a James Holly Hanford Distinguished Book Award.

    Michael Witmore, Folger Shakespeare Library, Washington DC
    Michael Witmore is Director of the Folger Shakespeare Library in Washington, DC. He is the author of Landscapes of the Passing Strange: Reflections from Shakespeare (with Rosamond Purcell, 2010), Shakespearean Metaphysics (2008), and Pretty Creatures: Children and Fiction in the English Renaissance (2007). He is also the editor of Childhood and Children's Books in Early Modern Europe, 1550–1800 (with Andrea Immel, 2006).

    Contributors

    David Loewenstein, Michael Witmore, David Bevington, Peter Marshall, Felicity Heal, Alison Shell, Beatrice Groves, Peter Lake, Adrian Streete, Ewan Fernie, Richard McCoy, Paul Stevens, Michael Davies, Matthew Dimmock, Brian Cummings

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