Skip to content

Due to scheduled maintenance, online ordering, in regions where offered, will not be available on this site from 08:00 until noon GMT on Sunday 17th February. We apologise for the inconvenience.

Cart

Your Cart

×

You have 0 items in your cart.

Register Sign in Wishlist
Protein and Energy

Protein and Energy
A Study of Changing Ideas in Nutrition

$112.00 (G)

  • Date Published: May 1994
  • availability: Available
  • format: Hardback
  • isbn: 9780521452090

$ 112.00 (G)
Hardback

Add to cart Add to wishlist

Looking for an examination copy?

If you are interested in the title for your course we can consider offering an examination copy. To register your interest please contact collegesales@cambridge.org providing details of the course you are teaching.

Description
Product filter button
Description
Contents
Resources
Courses
About the Authors
  • This book offers an intriguing look at the historical context of the repeated controversies during the past 150 years over the relative merits of a high-protein versus a low-protein diet. It puts the protein controversy into a historical perspective that sheds light on the scientific aspects of these questions and their historical development in a way that should be of interest to a wide range of readers in medicine, nutrition, public health, and history of science and medicine.

    • First comprehensive treatment of this topic
    • Up-to-date historical perspective
    • Well known and distinct author
    Read more

    Reviews & endorsements

    "...Carpenter breaks new and exciting ground, raising many issues that merit further investigation." Sally Horrocks, Nature

    "...reviews the long-standing debate over the relative merits of a high-protein versus a low-protein diet, and puts the protein controversy into an historical perspective that sheds light not only on the topic itself, but also on the scientific process." Nutrition Today

    "Kenneth J. Carpenter's fine monograph Protein and Energy confines its brief to two basic questions of human nutrition: how much protein do we need, and why? So central are these questions that his volume touches very much more, from the use of animal models in biomedical research to the role of authority in the modern world....Carpenter's volume puts these and many other facets of nutritional history into place. He makes excellent use of his contemporary scientific knowledge in elucidating the past, and he is even-handed in dealing with a subject riddled with hasty pronouncements and gullible consumers." W. F. Bynum, Times Literary Supplement

    "The history of nutrition, as covered in this book, is both well documented and interestingly written....useful and thought provoking. Valuable to readers interested in nutrition." Choice

    "...Carpenter's excellent discussion of the international efforts to fill the'protein gap' raises many complex social and political questions." Joseph S. Fruton, Bulletin of the History of Medicine

    "...a thought-provoking account of the pleasures and pitfalls of acquiring and applying nutrition knowledge, using the history of research on protein-energy nutrition as his focus...Thorough and balanced, this book should be of strong interest to nutrition researchers and policymakers. It also would be useful as supplemental reading in classes on the history of nutrition, protein-energy nutrition, research methods, international nutrition, and public policy." Joanne F. Guthrie, Journal of Nutrition Education

    "...a scholarly, well written and abundantly referenced volume...a recommended chronicle of the history and paradigm shifts of protein nutrition." James W. Larrick, Journal of Applied Nutrition

    "Benchmark discoveries in protein nutriture are described with regard to the social, economic, and even political issues of the day. Students of nutrition will be interested by the weaving of facts from science and history to add a human element to important scientific discoveries that is so often lacking in conventional nutrition texts....It would provide those enrolled in a capstone course with opportunities to integrate information from basic, applied, social, and behavioral sciences." Laura K. Guyer, American Journal of Human Biology

    See more reviews

    Customer reviews

    Not yet reviewed

    Be the first to review

    Review was not posted due to profanity

    ×

    , create a review

    (If you're not , sign out)

    Please enter the right captcha value
    Please enter a star rating.
    Your review must be a minimum of 12 words.

    How do you rate this item?

    ×

    Product details

    • Date Published: May 1994
    • format: Hardback
    • isbn: 9780521452090
    • length: 296 pages
    • dimensions: 235 x 158 x 28 mm
    • weight: 0.64kg
    • contains: 14 b/w illus.
    • availability: Available
  • Table of Contents

    1. Nutritional science before the Chemical Revolution (1614–1773)
    2. Nutrition in the light of the New Chemistry (1773–1839)
    3. 'Protein' discovered and enthroned (1838–1845)
    4. Things fall apart (1846–1875)
    5. Vegetarian philosophies and Voit's standards (1875–1893)
    6. Chittenden versus the U.S. establishment (1883–1912)
    7. Vitamins and amino acids (1910–1950)
    8. Protein deficiency as a Third World problem (1933–1957)
    9. International actions to produce high-protein supplements (1955–1990)
    10. Re-appraisals of the Third World problem (1955–1990)
    11. Adult needs for amino acids: a new controversy (1950–1992)
    12. Retrospect
    Appendices: A. Chemical structure of amino acids
    B. The measurement of protein quality
    C. Calculations of amino acid balance using an isotope label.

  • Author

    Kenneth Carpenter, University of California, Berkeley

Sign In

Please sign in to access your account

Cancel

Not already registered? Create an account now. ×

Sorry, this resource is locked

Please register or sign in to request access. If you are having problems accessing these resources please email lecturers@cambridge.org

Register Sign in
Please note that this file is password protected. You will be asked to input your password on the next screen.

» Proceed

You are now leaving the Cambridge University Press website. Your eBook purchase and download will be completed by our partner www.ebooks.com. Please see the permission section of the www.ebooks.com catalogue page for details of the print & copy limits on our eBooks.

Continue ×

Continue ×

Continue ×

Find content that relates to you

This site uses cookies to improve your experience. Read more Close

Are you sure you want to delete your account?

This cannot be undone.

Cancel

Thank you for your feedback which will help us improve our service.

If you requested a response, we will make sure to get back to you shortly.

×
Please fill in the required fields in your feedback submission.
×