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The Cambridge Companion to Ballet

$36.99 (P)

Part of Cambridge Companions to Music

Ivor Guest, Marion Kant, Jennifer Nevile, Marina Nordera, Barbara Ravelhofer, Mark Franko, Dorion Weickmann, Sandra Noll Hammond, Tim Blanning, Judith Chazin-Benahum, Inge Baxmann, Sarah Davis Cordova, Anne Middlebo Christensen, Marian E. Smith, Lynn Garafola, Thérèse Hurley, Lucia Ruprecht, Erik Näslund, Tim Scholl, Matilda Butkas, Juliet Bellow, Jennifer Fisher, Yangwen Zhen, Lester Tome
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  • Date Published: June 2007
  • availability: Available
  • format: Paperback
  • isbn: 9780521539869

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About the Authors
  • Ballet is a paradox: much loved but little studied. It is a beautiful fairy tale; detached from its origins and unrelated to the men and women who created it. Yet ballet has a history, little known and rarely presented. These great works have dark sides and moral ambiguities, not always nor immediately visible. The daring and challenging quality of ballet as well as its perceived 'safe' nature is not only one of its fascinations but one of the intriguing questions to be explored in this Companion. The essays reveal the conception, intent and underlying meaning of ballets and recreate the historical reality in which they emerged. The reader will find new and unexpected aspects of ballet, its history and its aesthetics, the evolution of plot and narrative, new insights into the reality of training, the choice of costume and the transformation of an old art in a modern world.

    • Essays are by an international team of writers
    • Sets the ballets in the vivid social context of their time, and considers how famous ballets evolved
    • Combines historical breadth with analytical precision
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    Reviews & endorsements

    ' … a stimulating read if your curiosity has already been aroused as to how and why ballet is like it is, and whether it has a future as well as a past.' Dance Now

    'This volume has a place in the libraries of dance institutions, but history departments may find it of use, as will anyone with a keen interest in classical and modern dance.' Reference Reviews

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    Product details

    • Date Published: June 2007
    • format: Paperback
    • isbn: 9780521539869
    • length: 396 pages
    • dimensions: 241 x 168 x 18 mm
    • weight: 0.64kg
    • contains: 50 b/w illus.
    • availability: Available
  • Table of Contents

    Foreword Ivor Guest
    Chronology
    Introduction Marion Kant
    Part I. From the Renaissance to the Baroque: Royal Power and Worldly Display:
    1. The early dance manuals and the structure of ballet: a basis for Italian, French and English ballet Jennifer Nevile
    2. Ballet de Cour Marina Nordera
    3. English masques Barbara Ravelhofer
    4. The Baroque body Mark Franko
    Part II. The Eighteenth Century: Revolutions in Technique and Spirit:
    5. Choreography and narrative: the ballet d'action of the eighteenth century Dorion Weickmann
    6. The rise of ballet technique and training: the professionalism of an art form Sandra Noll Hammond
    7. The making of history: John Weaver and the enlightenment Tim Blanning
    8. Jean-Georges Noverre: dance and reform Judith Chazin-Benahum
    9. The French Revolution and its spectacles Inge Baxmann
    Part III. Romantic Ballet: Ballet is a Woman:
    10. Romantic ballet in France:
    1830–50 Sarah Davis Cordova
    11. Deadly sylphs and decent mermaids: the women in the Danish romantic world of August Bournonville Anne Middlebo Christensen
    12. The orchestra as translator: French nineteenth-century ballet Marian E. Smith
    13. Russian ballet in the age of Petipa Lynn Garafola
    14. Opening the door to a fairy tale world: Tchaikovsky's ballet music Thérèse Hurley
    15. The romantic ballet and its critics: dance goes public Lucia Ruprecht
    16. The soul of the shoe Marion Kant
    Part IV. The Twentieth Century: Tradition Becomes Modern:
    17. The ballet avant-garde I: the Ballet Suedois and its modernist concept Erik Näslund
    18. The ballet avant-garde II: the 'new' ballet: Russian and Soviet dance in the twentieth century Tim Scholl
    19. George Balanchine Matilda Butkas
    20. Balanchine and the deconstruction of classicism Juliet Bellow
    21. The Nutcracker: a cultural icon Jennifer Fisher
    22. From Swan Lake to Red Girl's Regiment: ballet's sinicisation Yangwen Zhen
    23. Giselle in a Cuban accent Lester Tome
    24. European ballet in the age of ideologies Marion Kant.

  • Editor

    Marion Kant, University of Pennsylvania
    Marion Kant teaches at the University of Pennsylvania.

    Contributors

    Ivor Guest, Marion Kant, Jennifer Nevile, Marina Nordera, Barbara Ravelhofer, Mark Franko, Dorion Weickmann, Sandra Noll Hammond, Tim Blanning, Judith Chazin-Benahum, Inge Baxmann, Sarah Davis Cordova, Anne Middlebo Christensen, Marian E. Smith, Lynn Garafola, Thérèse Hurley, Lucia Ruprecht, Erik Näslund, Tim Scholl, Matilda Butkas, Juliet Bellow, Jennifer Fisher, Yangwen Zhen, Lester Tome

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