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Look Inside Jazz Icons

Jazz Icons
Heroes, Myths and the Jazz Tradition

$47.99 (C)

  • Date Published: February 2013
  • availability: In stock
  • format: Paperback
  • isbn: 9781107610828

$ 47.99 (C)
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About the Authors
  • Today, jazz history is dominated by iconic figures who have taken on an almost God-like status. From Satchmo to Duke, Bird to Trane, these legendary jazzmen form the backbone of the jazz tradition. Jazz icons not only provide musicians and audiences with figureheads to revere but have also come to stand for a number of values and beliefs that shape our view of the music itself. Jazz Icons explores the growing significance of icons in jazz and discusses the reasons why the music's history is increasingly dependent on the legacies of 'great men'. Using a series of individual case studies, Whyton examines the influence of jazz icons through different forms of historical mediation, including the recording, language, image and myth. The book encourages readers to take a fresh look at their relationship with iconic figures of the past and challenges many of the dominant narratives in jazz today.

    • Contains free-standing case study chapters on legendary figures including Louis Armstrong and Duke Ellington, which make the book well-suited to pedagogical use
    • Provides readers with fresh insights into the lives and music of jazz greats who still command a huge following
    • Draws upon examples from film, literature and advertising to provide a choice of approach for the reader
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    Reviews & endorsements

    "However, those inside the jazz world who are willing to undertake a critical evaluation of their practices will find the volume enlightening, and those outside it who have marveled at the gushing praise reserved for various jazz figures and dates will find here one plausible explanation for that reception."
    -C.Wadsworth Walker, Kansas City Kansas Community College

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    Product details

    • Date Published: February 2013
    • format: Paperback
    • isbn: 9781107610828
    • length: 227 pages
    • dimensions: 245 x 174 x 12 mm
    • weight: 0.44kg
    • contains: 10 b/w illus.
    • availability: In stock
  • Table of Contents

    Introduction: jazz narratives and sonic icons
    1. Jazz icons, heroes and myths
    2. Jazz and the disembodied voice
    3. Not a wonderful world: Louis Armstrong meets Kenny G.
    4. Men can't help acting on impulse!
    5. Witnessing and the jazz anecdote
    6. Dispelling the myth: essentialist Ellington
    7. Birth of the school.

  • Author

    Tony Whyton, University of Salford
    Tony Whyton is Director of the Salford Music Research Centre at the University of Salford. As Professor of Jazz and Musical Cultures, he co-edits the internationally peer-reviewed Jazz Research Journal and, in 2011, edited the jazz volume of the Ashgate Library of Essays on Popular Music. He is the Project Leader for the HERA-funded Rhythm Changes: Jazz Cultures and European Identities programme and author of the forthcoming book Beyond A Love Supreme.

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