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Confucian Ethics
A Comparative Study of Self, Autonomy, and Community

$108.00 (P)

Craig K. Ihara, David B. Wong, Henry Rosemont, Jr., Chad Hansen, Joel J. Kupperman, Chung-ying Cheng, Bryan W. Van Norden, Kwong-loi Shun, Alasdair MacIntyre
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  • Date Published: September 2004
  • availability: In stock
  • format: Hardback
  • isbn: 9780521792172

$ 108.00 (P)
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  • The Chinese ethical tradition has often been thought to oppose Western views of the self--as autonomous and possessed of individual rights--with views that emphasize the centrality of relationship and community to the self. The essays in this collection discuss the validity of that contrast as it concerns Confucianism, the single most influential Chinese school of thought. (Alasdair MacIntyre, who has significantly articulated the need for dialogue across traditions, contributes a concluding essay of commentary.)

    • Book suitable for a growing number of courses in comparative ethics
    • Essay by Alasdair MacIntyre will be a selling point
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    Reviews & endorsements

    "This volume is a scholarly work on the essential features of Confucian ethics." - Wing-cheuk Chan, Brock University

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    Product details

    • Date Published: September 2004
    • format: Hardback
    • isbn: 9780521792172
    • length: 238 pages
    • dimensions: 236 x 158 x 20 mm
    • weight: 0.44kg
    • contains: 1 b/w illus.
    • availability: In stock
  • Table of Contents

    Introduction
    Part I. Rights and Community:
    1. Are claim rights necessary?: a Confucian perspective Craig K. Ihara
    2. Rights and community in Confucianism David B. Wong
    3. Whose democracy? Which rights? A confucian critique of modern western liberalism Henry Rosemont, Jr.
    4. The normative impact of comparative ethics: human rights Chad Hansen
    Part II. Self and Self-Cultivation:
    5. Tradition and community in the formation of the self Joel J. Kupperman
    6. A theory of Confucian selfhood: self-cultivation and free will in confucian philosophy Chung-ying Cheng
    7. The virtue of righteousness in Mencius Bryan W. Van Norden
    8. Concept of the person in Confucian thought Kwong-loi Shun
    Part III. Comments:
    9. Questions for Confucians: reflections on the essays in comparative study of self, autonomy and community Alasdair MacIntyre.

  • Instructors have used or reviewed this title for the following courses

    • Asian Philosophy
  • Editors

    Kwong-Loi Shun, University of California, Berkeley
    Kwong-loi Shun is Professor of Philosophy at the University of California, Berkeley.

    David B. Wong, Duke University, North Carolina
    David B. Wong is Professor of Philosophy at Duke University.

    Contributors

    Craig K. Ihara, David B. Wong, Henry Rosemont, Jr., Chad Hansen, Joel J. Kupperman, Chung-ying Cheng, Bryan W. Van Norden, Kwong-loi Shun, Alasdair MacIntyre

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