Skip to content
Register Sign in Wishlist
Practical Reasoning about Final Ends

Practical Reasoning about Final Ends

$63.99 (P)

Part of Cambridge Studies in Philosophy

  • Date Published: February 1997
  • availability: Available
  • format: Paperback
  • isbn: 9780521574426

$ 63.99 (P)
Paperback

Add to cart Add to wishlist

Other available formats:
Hardback


Looking for an examination copy?

If you are interested in the title for your course we can consider offering an examination copy. To register your interest please contact collegesales@cambridge.org providing details of the course you are teaching.

Description
Product filter button
Description
Contents
Resources
Courses
About the Authors
  • How should we reason about what we do? The answer offered by most recent philosophy, as well as such disciplines as decision theory, welfare economics, and political science, is that we should select efficient means to our ends. However, if we ask how we should decide which ends or goals to aim at, these standard theoretical approaches are silent. Henry Richardson argues that we can determine our ends rationally. He constructs a rich and original theory of how we can reason about what to seek for its own sake as a final goal. Richardson defuses the counterarguments for the limits of rational deliberation, and develops interesting ideas about how his model might be extended to interpersonal deliberation of ends, taking him to the borders of political theory.

    • Major new interpretation of the theory of rationality
    • Strong endorsements from two pre-eminent philosophers, Martha Nussbaum and Michael Bratman
    • Should interest social scientists in economics, law, and political science as well as philosophers
    Read more

    Reviews & endorsements

    'This profound and important book challenges a common assumption about rationality: that all rational deliberation involves the selection of instrumental means to ends that are set by some non-rational process, for example by desires that are themselves impervious to reasoning. Drawing resourcefully on arguments of Aristotle and Plato, Richardson constructs an impressive account of the rationality involved in our selection and modification of our ultimate ends, and particularly of the ways in which a vague end can be more and more adequately specified by reflection. In the process, he offers the best account I have seen of the arguments for and against the claim that all values can be measured by a single common metric.' Martha Nussbaum, University of Chicago Law School

    Customer reviews

    Not yet reviewed

    Be the first to review

    Review was not posted due to profanity

    ×

    , create a review

    (If you're not , sign out)

    Please enter the right captcha value
    Please enter a star rating.
    Your review must be a minimum of 12 words.

    How do you rate this item?

    ×

    Product details

    • Date Published: February 1997
    • format: Paperback
    • isbn: 9780521574426
    • length: 344 pages
    • dimensions: 215 x 138 x 23 mm
    • weight: 0.36kg
    • availability: Available
  • Table of Contents

    Part I. Problem:
    1. Introduction
    2. Practical reasoning
    Part II. Scope:
    3. Ends in deliberation
    4. Specifying ends
    Part III. System:
    5. Value incommensurability
    6. Is commensurability a prerequisite of rational choice?
    7. Practical coherence
    8. Reflective sovereignty
    Part IV. Source:
    9. Sources and limits
    10. Ultimate ends
    Part V. Disagreement:
    11. Interpersonal deliberation
    12. Disagreement in concept and in practice
    13. Dialectical softening
    14. Realizing rationality.

  • Author

    Henry S. Richardson, Georgetown University, Washington DC

Sign In

Please sign in to access your account

Cancel

Not already registered? Create an account now. ×

Sorry, this resource is locked

Please register or sign in to request access. If you are having problems accessing these resources please email lecturers@cambridge.org

Register Sign in
Please note that this file is password protected. You will be asked to input your password on the next screen.

» Proceed

You are now leaving the Cambridge University Press website. Your eBook purchase and download will be completed by our partner www.ebooks.com. Please see the permission section of the www.ebooks.com catalogue page for details of the print & copy limits on our eBooks.

Continue ×

Continue ×

Continue ×

Find content that relates to you

Join us online

This site uses cookies to improve your experience. Read more Close

Are you sure you want to delete your account?

This cannot be undone.

Cancel

Thank you for your feedback which will help us improve our service.

If you requested a response, we will make sure to get back to you shortly.

×
Please fill in the required fields in your feedback submission.
×