Skip to content
Cart

Your Cart

×

You have 0 items in your cart.

Register Sign in Wishlist

Physical Perspectives on Computation, Computational Perspectives on Physics

$99.99 (C)

Michael E. Cuffaro, Samuel C. Fletcher; Gualtiero Piccinini, Neal G. Anderson, B. Jack Copeland, Oron Shagrir, Mark Sprevak, Rossella Lupacchini, Armond Duwell, Owen J. E. Maroney, Christopher G. Timpson, Dominic Horsman, Viv Kendon, Susan Stepney, Klaus Sutner, Robert H. C. Moir, Hajnal Andréka, Judit X. Madarász, István Németi, Péter Németi, Gergely Székely, James Ladyman, John D. Norton, Adam Koberinski, Markus P. Müller
View all contributors
  • Date Published: June 2018
  • availability: In stock
  • format: Hardback
  • isbn: 9781107171190

$ 99.99 (C)
Hardback

Add to cart Add to wishlist

Other available formats:
eBook


Looking for an examination copy?

If you are interested in the title for your course we can consider offering an examination copy. To register your interest please contact collegesales@cambridge.org providing details of the course you are teaching.

Description
Product filter button
Description
Contents
Resources
Courses
About the Authors
  • Although computation and the science of physical systems would appear to be unrelated, there are a number of ways in which computational and physical concepts can be brought together in ways that illuminate both. This volume examines fundamental questions which connect scholars from both disciplines: is the universe a computer? Can a universal computing machine simulate every physical process? What is the source of the computational power of quantum computers? Are computational approaches to solving physical problems and paradoxes always fruitful? Contributors from multiple perspectives reflecting the diversity of thought regarding these interconnections address many of the most important developments and debates within this exciting area of research. Both a reference to the state of the art and a valuable and accessible entry to interdisciplinary work, the volume will interest researchers and students working in physics, computer science, and philosophy of science and mathematics.

    • Fills the gap in the book-length treatments of the interrelations between computation and physics, especially within philosophy
    • Provides a reference point for the state of the art in important topics and research questions in this area
    • Brings together scholars from a wide range of perspectives and disciplines
    Read more

    Customer reviews

    Not yet reviewed

    Be the first to review

    Review was not posted due to profanity

    ×

    , create a review

    (If you're not , sign out)

    Please enter the right captcha value
    Please enter a star rating.
    Your review must be a minimum of 12 words.

    How do you rate this item?

    ×

    Product details

    • Date Published: June 2018
    • format: Hardback
    • isbn: 9781107171190
    • length: 324 pages
    • dimensions: 235 x 157 x 18 mm
    • weight: 0.64kg
    • availability: In stock
  • Table of Contents

    List of figures
    List of tables
    Preface
    Introduction Michael E. Cuffaro and Samuel C. Fletcher
    Part I. The Computability of Physical Systems and Physical Systems as Computers:
    1. Ontic pancomputationalism Gualtiero Piccinini and Neal G. Anderson
    2. Zuse's thesis, Gandy's thesis, and Penrose's thesis B. Jack Copeland, Oron Shagrir and Mark Sprevak
    3. Church's thesis, Turing's limits, and Deutsch's principle Rossella Lupacchini
    Part II. The Implementation of Computation in Physical Systems:
    4. How to make orthogonal positions parallel: revisiting the quantum parallelism thesis Armond Duwell
    5. How is there a physics of information? On characterizing physical evolution as information processing Owen J. E. Maroney and Christopher G. Timpson
    6. Abstraction/representation theory and the natural science of computation Dominic Horsman, Viv Kendon and Susan Stepney
    Part III. Physical Perspectives on Computer Science:
    7. Physics-like models of computation Klaus Sutner
    8. Feasible computation: methodological contributions from computational science Robert H. C. Moir
    9. Relativistic computation Hajnal Andréka, Judit X. Madarász, István Németi, Péter Németi and Gergely Székely
    Part IV. Computational Perspectives on Physical Theory:
    10. Intension in the physics of computation: lessons from the debate about Landauer's principle James Ladyman
    11. Maxwell's demon does not compute John D. Norton
    12. Quantum theory as a principle theory: insights from an information-theoretic reconstruction Adam Koberinski and Markus P. Müller
    Bibliography
    Index.

  • Editors

    Michael E. Cuffaro, University of Western Ontario
    Michael E. Cuffaro is a Postdoctoral Research Fellow of the Rotman Institute of Philosophy at the University of Western Ontario and an external member of the Munich Center for Mathematical Philosophy at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München.

    Samuel C. Fletcher, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities
    Samuel C. Fletcher is an Assistant Professor of Philosophy at the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities, a resident fellow of the Minnesota Center for Philosophy of Science, and an external member of the Munich Center for Mathematical Philosophy at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München.

    Contributors

    Michael E. Cuffaro, Samuel C. Fletcher; Gualtiero Piccinini, Neal G. Anderson, B. Jack Copeland, Oron Shagrir, Mark Sprevak, Rossella Lupacchini, Armond Duwell, Owen J. E. Maroney, Christopher G. Timpson, Dominic Horsman, Viv Kendon, Susan Stepney, Klaus Sutner, Robert H. C. Moir, Hajnal Andréka, Judit X. Madarász, István Németi, Péter Németi, Gergely Székely, James Ladyman, John D. Norton, Adam Koberinski, Markus P. Müller

Sign In

Please sign in to access your account

Cancel

Not already registered? Create an account now. ×

Sorry, this resource is locked

Please register or sign in to request access. If you are having problems accessing these resources please email lecturers@cambridge.org

Register Sign in
Please note that this file is password protected. You will be asked to input your password on the next screen.

» Proceed

You are now leaving the Cambridge University Press website. Your eBook purchase and download will be completed by our partner www.ebooks.com. Please see the permission section of the www.ebooks.com catalogue page for details of the print & copy limits on our eBooks.

Continue ×

Continue ×

Continue ×

Find content that relates to you

This site uses cookies to improve your experience. Read more Close

Are you sure you want to delete your account?

This cannot be undone.

Cancel

Thank you for your feedback which will help us improve our service.

If you requested a response, we will make sure to get back to you shortly.

×
Please fill in the required fields in your feedback submission.
×