Skip to content
Register Sign in Wishlist
Physical Origins of Time Asymmetry

Physical Origins of Time Asymmetry

$135.00 (P)

A. Albrecht, J. Barbour, C. Bennett, I. Bialynicki-Birula, C. Caves, T. Cover, B. Dewitt, F. Dowker, M. Gell-Mann, P. Gonzaliz-Diaz, R. Griffiths J. Halliwell, J. Hartle, S. Hawking, B. Hu, K. Kuchar, R. Lafflamme, J. Lebowitz, S. Lloyd, J. Louko, W. Miller, E. Mottola, V. Mukhanov, R. Omnes, P. C. W. Davies, T. Padmanabhan, D. Page, J. Paz, J. Perez-Mercader, L. Schulman, B. Schumacher, A. Starobinsky, C. Teitelboim, W. Uuruh, M. Velarde, J. Wheeler, W. Wootters, J. York, H. Zeh, W. Zurek
View all contributors
  • Date Published: March 1996
  • availability: Available
  • format: Paperback
  • isbn: 9780521568371

$ 135.00 (P)
Paperback

Add to cart Add to wishlist

Looking for an examination copy?

If you are interested in the title for your course we can consider offering an examination copy. To register your interest please contact collegesales@cambridge.org providing details of the course you are teaching.

Description
Product filter button
Description
Contents
Resources
Courses
About the Authors
  • In the world about us, the past is distinctly different from the future. More precisely, we say that the processes going on in the world about us are asymmetric in time or display an arrow of time. Yet this manifest fact of our experience is particularly difficult to explain in terms of the fundamental laws of physics. Newton's laws, quantum mechanics, electromagnetism, Einstein's theory of gravity, etc., make no distinction between past and future - they are time-symmetric. Reconciliation of these profoundly conflicting facts is the topic of this volume. It is an interdisciplinary survey of the variety of interconnected phenomena defining arrows of time, and their possible explanations in terms of underlying time-symmetric laws of physics.

    • Contributions from world-renowned researchers in theoretical physics including Stephen Hawking
    • Interdisciplinary survey
    Read more

    Reviews & endorsements

    "...a veritable fireworks of ideas in computation, physics and cosmology. Some of the discussion is also recorded, and this adds considerably to the reader's understanding and enjoyment of the book....The distinction of the participants and the intrinsic interest of the topics discussed make this a book that should be available to all physicists as well as to students of cognate subjects." Peter T. Landsberg, Nature

    "...[provides] an in-depth introduction to a fascinating set of inter-related topics about the nature of time. It is written at a level that is sure to be stimulating to a sophisticated theorist while still accessible to a young graduate student." Gino Segre, Physics Today

    "...sure to plant the seeds for further lines of investigation on this intriguing and very fundamental set of issues." Robert Waid, Foundations of Physics

    See more reviews

    Customer reviews

    Not yet reviewed

    Be the first to review

    Review was not posted due to profanity

    ×

    , create a review

    (If you're not , sign out)

    Please enter the right captcha value
    Please enter a star rating.
    Your review must be a minimum of 12 words.

    How do you rate this item?

    ×

    Product details

    • Date Published: March 1996
    • format: Paperback
    • isbn: 9780521568371
    • length: 536 pages
    • dimensions: 235 x 191 x 27 mm
    • weight: 0.91kg
    • contains: 61 b/w illus.
    • availability: Available
  • Table of Contents

    1. Investigations of quantum decoherence A. Albrecht
    2. The emergence of time and its arrow from timelessness J. Barbour
    3. Complexity C. Bennet
    4. Unorthodox thoughts about time I. Bialynicki-Birula
    5. Temperature and time in the geometry of rotating black holes J. D. Brown and J. W. York
    6. Information, chaos and statistical physics C. Caves
    7. Time asymmetry and the flow of information T. Cover
    8. Decoherence without complexity and without an arrow of time B. Dewitt
    9. The decoherence functional in quantum mechanics F. Dowker
    10. Quantum cosmology and the arrow of time M. Gell-Mann
    11. Wormholes and time asymmetry P. Gonzalez-Diaz
    12. Statistical irreversibility: classical and quantum R. Griffiths
    13. Time asymmetry and quantum cosmology J. Halliwell
    14. The arrow of time in quantum mechanics J. Hartle
    15. My greatest mistake S. Hawking
    16. Fluctuation-dissipation in quantum fields and gravitational entropy B. Hu
    17. Time and interpretation of quantum gravity K. Kuchar
    18. The arrow of time in the Hartle-Hawking wave function R. Lafflamme
    19. Quantum mechanics, statistical mechanics and the origins of time asymmetry J. Lebowitz
    20. Information flow S. Lloyd
    21. Times at early times J. Louko
    22. Time, information and quantum correlations W. Miller
    23. Fluctuation-dissipation theorem in general relativity and the cosmological constant E. Mottola
    24. Time asymmetry and the interpretation of quantum mechanics V. Mukhanov
    25. Logical time asymmetry in quantum mechanics R. Omnes
    26. Stirring up trouble P. C. W. Davies
    27. Time, quantum cosmology and Mach's principle T. Padmanabhan
    28. Entropy versus clock time D. Page
    29. Decoherence and back-reaction J. Paz
    30. Essay on time J. Perez-Mercadier
    31. Time-symmetric cosmology and definite quantum measurements L. Schulman
    32. Demonic heat engines and the second law B. Schumacher
    33. Decoherence and the arrow of time in the inflationary scenario A. Starobinsky
    34. Essay on time C. Teitelboim
    35. Time in quantum gravity W. Unruh
    36. Instability, escape and chaos in a driven asymmetric non-linear oscillator M. Velarde
    37. How come time? J. Wheeler
    38. Is time asymmetry logically prior to quantum mechanics W. Wootters
    39. Time (A-)symmetry in recollapsing quantum universe H. Zeh
    40. Toward a quantum theory of classical reality W. Zurek.

  • Editors

    J. J. Halliwell, Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine, London

    J. Pérez-Mercader

    W. H. Zurek, Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Contributors

    A. Albrecht, J. Barbour, C. Bennett, I. Bialynicki-Birula, C. Caves, T. Cover, B. Dewitt, F. Dowker, M. Gell-Mann, P. Gonzaliz-Diaz, R. Griffiths J. Halliwell, J. Hartle, S. Hawking, B. Hu, K. Kuchar, R. Lafflamme, J. Lebowitz, S. Lloyd, J. Louko, W. Miller, E. Mottola, V. Mukhanov, R. Omnes, P. C. W. Davies, T. Padmanabhan, D. Page, J. Paz, J. Perez-Mercader, L. Schulman, B. Schumacher, A. Starobinsky, C. Teitelboim, W. Uuruh, M. Velarde, J. Wheeler, W. Wootters, J. York, H. Zeh, W. Zurek

Sign In

Please sign in to access your account

Cancel

Not already registered? Create an account now. ×

Sorry, this resource is locked

Please register or sign in to request access. If you are having problems accessing these resources please email lecturers@cambridge.org

Register Sign in
Please note that this file is password protected. You will be asked to input your password on the next screen.

» Proceed

You are now leaving the Cambridge University Press website. Your eBook purchase and download will be completed by our partner www.ebooks.com. Please see the permission section of the www.ebooks.com catalogue page for details of the print & copy limits on our eBooks.

Continue ×

Continue ×

Continue ×

Find content that relates to you

Join us online

This site uses cookies to improve your experience. Read more Close

Are you sure you want to delete your account?

This cannot be undone.

Cancel

Thank you for your feedback which will help us improve our service.

If you requested a response, we will make sure to get back to you shortly.

×
Please fill in the required fields in your feedback submission.
×