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Race and Regionalism in the Politics of Taxation in Brazil and South Africa

$92.00 (P)

Part of Cambridge Studies in Comparative Politics

  • Date Published: September 2003
  • availability: In stock
  • format: Hardback
  • isbn: 9780521816786

$ 92.00 (P)
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About the Authors
  • Evan Lieberman's analysis focuses on the politics of taxation as a way of understanding the development of governments. He compares Brazil and South Africa because of their similarities: They are upper-middle-income countries, and highly unequal--both in terms of income and racial status. Lieberman argues that different constitutional approaches to race (whether or not to grant equal citizenship to blacks) and federalism (whether to have it or not) shaped the organization of politics in the two countries, leading to the development of very different tax systems. The findings are based on extensive field research, large-scale national surveys, macroeconomic data, and various archival and secondary sources.

    • Focuses on the fascinating countries of Brazil and South Africa - the two most unequal societies on Earth, regional leaders in Africa and Latin American
    • Demonstrates the relationship between the politics of identity and the very concrete policy area of taxation
    • Uses a range of analytic methods, including structured comparative historical analysis, and statistical analyses
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    Reviews & endorsements

    "Tax policies are telling and shaped by the most fundamental aspects of politics, including how collective identies and obligations are perceived and acted upon. Lieberman provides a pathbreaking comparative study which richly explores this issue, using an impressive array of sources and methods. The result will recast and inform the debate." Anthony Marx, Columbia University

    "At a time when governing is too often reduced to a management problem, Evan Lieberman has performed a timely service by reminding us of the importance of identities and a sense of community in shaping the way we relate to government. This study of a vital aspect of state capacity, taxation in two important societies of the South, is an important contribution to our understanding of relations between states and citizens." Steven Friedman, Centre for Policy Studies

    "Race and Regionalism is an excellent book. Through a careful analysis of the growth of the Tax State in South Africa and Brazil this book offers enormous insights into political development far beyond the issue area of taxation and Historical Institutionalist theory and to our understanding of the role of fiscal policy in political and economic development. It is a model of comparative historical analysis." Sven Steinmo, University of Colorado

    "Race and Regionalism is a terrific book." American Journal of Sociology

    "Evan Lieberman has produced a first-rate work of comparative political economy. Just as importantly, he has done so by going boldly (and engagingly where so few have gone before -- into the tax state...Essential reading to all students of comparative political economy." APSA Perspectives on Politics

    "This intriguing and counter-intuitive argument, based mostly on secondary sources and recent field research, makes this a very important and pioneering work...Lieberman shines a bright light on a very promising research path that one hopes future researchers will pursue." The Americas, Steven Tonk, University of California, Irvine

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    Product details

    • Date Published: September 2003
    • format: Hardback
    • isbn: 9780521816786
    • length: 344 pages
    • dimensions: 235 x 160 x 24 mm
    • weight: 0.575kg
    • contains: 23 b/w illus. 20 tables
    • availability: In stock
  • Table of Contents

    1. The model of identity and sacrifice
    2. The tax state in comparative perspective
    3. Critical juncture: defining national political community
    4. The rise of the modern tax state in Brazil and South Africa
    5. Shadows of the past: tax reform in an era of globalization and democratization
    6. Identity and sacrifice beyond Brazil and South Africa
    7. Conclusion.

  • Author

    Evan S. Lieberman, Princeton University, New Jersey

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