Skip to content
Cart

Your Cart

×

You have 0 items in your cart.

Register Sign in Wishlist
Ecological Inference

Ecological Inference
New Methodological Strategies

$57.99 (C)

Part of Analytical Methods for Social Research

Gary King, Ori Rosen, Martin A. Tanner, Jonathan C. Wakefield, David G. Steel, Eric J. Beh, Raymond Lourenco Chambers, D. Stephen Voss, Jeffry B. Lewis, Bernard Grofman, Samuel Merrill, J. Kevin Corder, Christina Wolbrecht, George G. Judge, Douglas J. Miller, Wendy K. Tam Cho, Rob Eisinga, Ben Pelzer, Philip Hans B. F. Franses, Kenneth R. Benoit, Michael Laver, Daniela Giannetti, Kevin M. Quinn, Carol A. Gotway, Linda J. Young, Ernesto Calvo, Marcelo Escolar, Sebastien Haneuse, Ruth E. Salway, Rogério Silva de Mattos, Álvaro Veiga, Micah Altman, Jeff Gill, Michael P. McDonald
View all contributors
  • Date Published: September 2004
  • availability: Available
  • format: Paperback
  • isbn: 9780521542807

$ 57.99 (C)
Paperback

Add to cart Add to wishlist

Other available formats:
Hardback, eBook


Looking for an examination copy?

If you are interested in the title for your course we can consider offering an examination copy. To register your interest please contact collegesales@cambridge.org providing details of the course you are teaching.

Description
Product filter button
Description
Contents
Resources
Courses
About the Authors
  • This collection of essays brings together a diverse group of scholars to survey the latest strategies for solving ecological inference problems in various fields. The last half-decade has witnessed an explosion of research in ecological inference--the process of trying to infer individual behavior from aggregate data. Although uncertainties and information lost in aggregation make ecological inference one of the most problematic types of research to rely on, these inferences are required in many academic fields, as well as by legislatures and the Courts in redistricting, by business in marketing research, and by governments in policy analysis.

    • Presents important advances beyond Gary King's original innovative approach to ecological inference
    • Includes contributions from a number of leading scholars
    • Offers solutions to ecological inference problems applicable to a wide range of fields
    Read more

    Customer reviews

    Not yet reviewed

    Be the first to review

    Review was not posted due to profanity

    ×

    , create a review

    (If you're not , sign out)

    Please enter the right captcha value
    Please enter a star rating.
    Your review must be a minimum of 12 words.

    How do you rate this item?

    ×

    Product details

    • Date Published: September 2004
    • format: Paperback
    • isbn: 9780521542807
    • length: 432 pages
    • dimensions: 254 x 178 x 22 mm
    • weight: 0.75kg
    • contains: 451 b/w illus. 54 tables
    • availability: Available
  • Table of Contents

    Introduction: information in ecological inference: an introduction Gary King, Ori Rosen and Martin A. Tanner
    Part I:
    1. Prior and likelihood choices in the analysis of ecological data Jonathan C. Wakefield
    2. Information in aggregate data David G. Steel, Eric J. Beh and Raymond Lourenco Chambers
    3. Using ecological inference for contextual research: when aggregation bias is the solution as well as the problem D. Stephen Voss
    Part II:
    4. Extending King's ecological inference model to multiple elections using Markov chain Monte Carlo Jeffry B. Lewis
    5. Ecological regression and ecological inference Bernard Grofman and Samuel Merrill
    6. Using prior information to aid ecological inference: a Bayesian approach J. Kevin Corder and Christina Wolbrecht
    7. An information theoretic approach to ecological estimation and inference George G. Judge, Douglas J. Miller and Wendy K. Tam Cho
    8. Ecological panel inference from repeated cross sections Rob Eisinga, Ben Pelzer and Philip Hans B. F. Franses
    Part III:
    9. Multi-party split-ticket voting estimation as an ecological inference problem Kenneth R. Benoit, Michael Laver and Daniela Giannetti
    10. Ecological inference in the presence of temporal dependence Kevin M. Quinn
    11. A spatial view of the ecological inference problem Carol A. Gotway and Linda J. Young
    12. Places and relationships in ecological inference: uncovering contextual effects through a geographically weighted autoregressive model Ernesto Calvo and Marcelo Escolar
    13. Ecological inference incorporating spatial dependence Sebastien Haneuse and Jonathan C. Wakefield
    Part IV:
    14. A common framework for ecological inference in epidemiology, political science and sociology Ruth E. Salway and Jonathan C. Wakefield
    15. A structured comparison of the Goodman regression, the truncated normal, and the binomial-beta hierarchical methods for ecological inference Rogério Silva de Mattos and Álvaro Veiga
    16. A comparison of the numerical properties of ei methods Micah Altman, Jeff Gill and Michael P. McDonald.

  • Editors

    Gary King, Harvard University, Massachusetts

    Ori Rosen, University of Pittsburgh

    Martin A. Tanner, Northwestern University, Illinois

    Contributors

    Gary King, Ori Rosen, Martin A. Tanner, Jonathan C. Wakefield, David G. Steel, Eric J. Beh, Raymond Lourenco Chambers, D. Stephen Voss, Jeffry B. Lewis, Bernard Grofman, Samuel Merrill, J. Kevin Corder, Christina Wolbrecht, George G. Judge, Douglas J. Miller, Wendy K. Tam Cho, Rob Eisinga, Ben Pelzer, Philip Hans B. F. Franses, Kenneth R. Benoit, Michael Laver, Daniela Giannetti, Kevin M. Quinn, Carol A. Gotway, Linda J. Young, Ernesto Calvo, Marcelo Escolar, Sebastien Haneuse, Ruth E. Salway, Rogério Silva de Mattos, Álvaro Veiga, Micah Altman, Jeff Gill, Michael P. McDonald

Sign In

Please sign in to access your account

Cancel

Not already registered? Create an account now. ×

Sorry, this resource is locked

Please register or sign in to request access. If you are having problems accessing these resources please email lecturers@cambridge.org

Register Sign in
Please note that this file is password protected. You will be asked to input your password on the next screen.

» Proceed

You are now leaving the Cambridge University Press website. Your eBook purchase and download will be completed by our partner www.ebooks.com. Please see the permission section of the www.ebooks.com catalogue page for details of the print & copy limits on our eBooks.

Continue ×

Continue ×

Continue ×

Find content that relates to you

This site uses cookies to improve your experience. Read more Close

Are you sure you want to delete your account?

This cannot be undone.

Cancel

Thank you for your feedback which will help us improve our service.

If you requested a response, we will make sure to get back to you shortly.

×
Please fill in the required fields in your feedback submission.
×