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Epidemics and Rumours in Complex Networks

$69.99 (P)

Part of London Mathematical Society Lecture Note Series

  • Date Published: January 2010
  • availability: Available
  • format: Paperback
  • isbn: 9780521734431

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  • Information propagation through peer-to-peer systems, online social systems, wireless mobile ad hoc networks and other modern structures can be modelled as an epidemic on a network of contacts. Understanding how epidemic processes interact with network topology allows us to predict ultimate course, understand phase transitions and develop strategies to control and optimise dissemination. This book is a concise introduction for applied mathematicians and computer scientists to basic models, analytical tools and mathematical and algorithmic results. Mathematical tools introduced include coupling methods, Poisson approximation (the Stein–Chen method), concentration inequalities (Chernoff bounds and Azuma–Hoeffding inequality) and branching processes. The authors examine the small-world phenomenon, preferential attachment, as well as classical epidemics. Each chapter ends with pointers to the wider literature. An ideal accompaniment for graduate courses, this book is also for researchers (statistical physicists, biologists, social scientists) who need an efficient guide to modern approaches to epidemic modelling on networks.

    • Provides a clear and rigorous treatment using both probabilistic and algorithmic approaches
    • Coverage includes well-known techniques and results as well as more recent advances
    • Includes end-of-chapter guides to the wider literature, ideal for researchers new to the field
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    Reviews & endorsements

    'this is a nice introduction, at the level of a graduate course, to the propagation of biological epidemics and the spread of rumours in networks, aimed at students in computer science and applied probability.' Zentralblatt MATH

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    Product details

    • Date Published: January 2010
    • format: Paperback
    • isbn: 9780521734431
    • length: 130 pages
    • dimensions: 221 x 150 x 10 mm
    • weight: 0.2kg
    • contains: 3 b/w illus.
    • availability: Available
  • Table of Contents

    Introduction
    Part I. Shapeless Networks:
    1. Galton-Watson branching processes
    2. Reed-Frost epidemics and Erdős-Rényi random graphs
    3. Connectivity and Poisson approximation
    4. Diameter of Erdős-Rényi graphs
    5. From microscopic to macroscopic dynamics
    Part II. Structured Networks:
    6. The small-world phenomenon
    7. Power laws via preferential attachment
    8. Epidemics on general graphs
    9. Viral marketing and optimised epidemics
    References
    Index.

  • Authors

    Moez Draief, Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine, London
    Moez Draief is Assistant Professor in the Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering at Imperial College, London.

    Laurent Massoulié, Thomson, Corporate Research, Paris
    Laurent Massoulié is Senior Researcher at Thomson Corporate Research in Paris. He has been the recipient of several best paper awards including ACM CoNEXT 2007.

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