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Home > Catalog > The Myth of the Ethical Consumer Paperback with DVD
The Myth of the Ethical Consumer Paperback with DVD
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Details

  • 28 b/w illus. 23 tables
  • Page extent: 253 pages
  • Size: 228 x 152 mm
  • Weight: 0.44 kg

1 Paperback, 1 DVD-ROM

 (ISBN-13: 9780521747554)

Unavailable - out of print February 2018

$51.99 (P)
The Myth of the Ethical Consumer
Cambridge University Press
9780521766944 - The Myth of the Ethical Consumer - By Timothy M. Devinney, Pat Auger and Giana M. Eckhardt
Index

Index

a priori segmentation of consumers 53–4, 114–15

actions

See consumer behavior

activists

effects of pressures on firms 34

ethics of power and influence 34

firms’ responses to pressure from 32–3

protests and demonstrations 10–11

social persuasion 30–1

adaptive unconscious model 42–3, , 46–8

consumer as evolved ape 46–8

affective events theory 52

AT&T 30

attitude–behavior gap, implication for measurement 56

attitudes

linear model of consumer behavior 48–50,

recursive model of consumer behavior 51–3

Australia, cross-cultural research 124–6

authorities, desire to pass responsibility to 133

Becker, Gary 167, 171

behavior motivation models 55–6

See also consumer behavior

beliefs

linear model of consumer behavior 48–50,

recursive model of consumer behavior 51–3,

See also values and beliefs

Ben & Jerry’s 3, 33, 34–5

Best Buy 31–2

best–worst (BW) experimental approach 141–2

Betfair 44

Bono (U2) 1, 2

boycotts of products or companies 10–11

brands and logos

influence of 30

value to the consumer 19–20,

British Union for the Abolition of Vivisection 39

Burger King 30

Calvin Klein 30

Caribou Coffee 3

Carnegie, Andrew 138

Carrefour 31–2, 36

categorization of consumers from survey information 53–4

China, cross-cultural research 128–32

citizen-consumer

concept 139–40

estimating general societal preferences 152–62, , ,

linking social and consumer preferences 162–5

measuring social issue priorities 140–52, , , ,

moral citizen myth 163–5,

trade-offs between social causes 140–52, , , ,

CNSR (consumer social responsibility)

definition 9

vs ethical consumerism 9–11

evolution of 35–6

impact on corporate economic profit 23–4

implications of ethical consumption research 39–40

means of expression 10–11

purchasing or non-purchasing behavior 10–11

relationship to corporate social responsibility 27, 33–5

revealed social preferences 10–11

role in consumer decision making 11–13

role of interpretive research 118–20

stated social preferences 10–11

value in the study of consumption 186–7

and willingness to pay 18–23

CNSR enhancement strategies 179–83

allow the consumer to learn and co-produce 180–1

approaches to social consumption investigation 179–80

focus on behavioral outcome 180

focus on ties and interactions with functionality 180

link behavior back to motivations 181–2

logical premises 182–3

persuasion and behavior reinforcement 181–2

use small-scale experimental steps 180–1

Co-operative Group (UK) 39

cognitive simplification 186

comparability problem in research 57–8

consumer, a priori segmentation 53–4, 114–15

consumer-as-voter model of social consumption 43–6

consumer behavior

archetypes 41–3

consumer as evolved ape 46–8

consumer-as-voter model of social consumption 43–6

consumer as vox populi 43–6

economic voter model of consumption 43–6

evolutionary biological view 46–8

importance of understanding 64–6

linear model of consumer behavior 48–9, 51

link with knowledge and beliefs 133

recursive model of consumer behavior 51–3,

social, economic, and political implications 64–6

consumer behavior archetypes

adaptive unconscious model 42–3, , 46–8

quasi-rational co-producer of value 42, 43

quasi-rational reactive purchaser 41–2, 43

rational informed processor 41, 43

See also social consumer behavior models

consumer behavior research

approaches 40–8

empirical approaches 40–1

models underlying empirical approaches 40–1

respondent bias issues 40

consumer choice

dilemma in ethical consumerism 168–9

and taste 166–72

consumer decision making, role of CNSR 11–13

consumer depth interviews, cross-cultural research 120–3,

consumer preferences

coevolution with products and services 29–30

constrained preferences 31–3

and CSR 33–5

evolution of 33–5

influence of brands and logos 30

influence of product advertising 30

influence of social persuasion 30–1

linking with social preferences 162–5

manipulation of the shopping experience 31–3

persuasion strategies 30–1

pressure on firms from activists 32–3

revelation to firms 29–30

consumer social behavior, review of studies 67–71

consumer social responsibility

See CNSR

consumer surplus 17–18

consumer value 17–18

market scenarios for social consumption 24–8,

consumerism

See ethical consumerism, social consumerism

consumption activity, testing for a social component 21–3


context

importance of 114, 177

interaction with values and beliefs 173–4

problem in research 58–9

and salience bias 137–9

core social value 20

corporate activity

economic profit in light of CNSR 23–4

economic profit motive 17–18

and social consumerism 16–28

corporate social responsibility (CSR) 16–17

and the ethical consumer 35–6

and evolution of customer preferences 33–5

relationship with CNSR 27, 33–5

role of the consumer 27

value creation 33–5

corporations

coevolving system of supply and demand 28–35

constraining consumer preferences 31–3

control of product mix on offer 31–2

ethics of power and influence 34

experimentation for and with consumers 29–30

influence of pressures from activists 34

influence on the social consumption context 28–35

manipulation of the shopping experience 31–3

motives for offering ethical products 34–5

persuasion strategies 30–1

response to pressure from activists 32–3

revelation of consumer preferences 29–30

scenarios of effects of social consumption 24–8,

counterfeit goods market 11

cross-cultural research

Australia 124–6

China 128–32

comparison with the mythical ethical consumer 134–6

consumer depth interviews 120–3,

desire to pass responsibility to authorities 133

developmental realist justifications 128–32

economic rationalist justifications 124–6

Germany 126–8

governmental dependent justifications 126–8

hostility toward social policy initiatives 133–4

India 128–32

information not a motivator 133

link between knowledge and behavior 133

rationales for consumption behaviors 123–32

Spain 124–8,

Sweden 126–8

trends in logic and justification 132–4

Turkey 128–32

USA 124–6

CSR

See corporate social responsibility

culture

and ethical consumerism 8

impact of cultural differences 108–9,

and rationalization of behavior 8

role in social consumption 175

See also cross-cultural research

customer

See consumer

David Jones (department store) 30

de gustibus non est disputandum (there is no accounting for tastes) 166–72

decision making, Kantian versus Humean approach 42–3

demographics

and ethical consumerism 7–8

experimental study 99, 100, 106

developmental realist justifications 128–32

discrete choice experimentation (DCE) 72–4

dolphin-safe tuna 64

domicile, and ethical consumerism 8

Drummond, John 173

Durex, annual sexual well-being survey 57


economic exchanges, as prediction markets 44

economic profit 17–18

in light of CNSR 23–4

economic rationalist justifications 124–6

economic voter model of consumption 43–6

Economist, The 30

elaboration likelihood model of persuasion 52

emotive social value 20–1

empirical truths

consumer responses to product social features 178–9

context interacts with values and beliefs 173–4

convenient truths 176–9

effectiveness of active persuasion 177

function trumps ethics 176

importance of context 177

inconvenient truths 172–6

ineffectiveness of passive information provision 177

influence of other social choices 177–8

intentions without trade-offs are suspect 173

role of culture 175

role of the group is overstated 174–5

role of the individual in understated 174–5

social consumption follows the law of demand 175–6

values and beliefs are overrated 173–4

empowerment dilemma in ethical consumerism 168–9

ethical consumer

assessing the myth 116

categorization from survey information 53–4

challenges to simplistic characterization 6–9

and the citizen-consumer 163–5,

comparison with real consumer behavior 134–6

evolution of the concept 1–2

as heroic ideal 134–6

interpreting the myth 134–6

jettisoning the myth 183–7

and the moral citizen myth 163–5,

mythical attributes 4–6

notions of what is ethical 4–5

Ethical Consumer Research Association 168

ethical consumerism

assumptions behind surveys 2–3

beliefs about consumer behavior 2–3

cognitive simplification 186

consumer choice dilemma 168–9

consumer empowerment dilemma 168–9

vs consumer social responsibility 9–11

and corporate social responsibility 35–6

and culture 8

demographics 7–8

and domicile 8

ethical judgment of individual taste 166–8

illusion of free will 36

implications of experimental studies 112–16

informing consumers 168–9

myth and self-deception 14–15

narrowness of studies 8–9

non-social aspects 21–3

overgeneralization of studies 8–9

possible motives for 21–3

review of studies 67–71

self-deception 186

surveys contradicted by purchasing behavior 9–13,

ethical consumption

implications of consumer behavior models 43

linear model of behavior 48–51,

myth of 60–3

ethical consumption research

implications for the ethical consumer 39–40

inability to predict consumer behavior 37–40

possible sources of bias 39

ethical disposition inventory 76–9

ethical judgment of individual taste 166–8


ethical products

extent of the market for 1–2, 3,

firms’ motives for offering 34–5

firms’ strategies toward 32–3

lack of public support for 1–2

low levels of purchase 11

niche markets 3,

evolution of CNSR 35–6

evolutionary biological view of the consumer 46–8

experimental studies

assessing the ethical consumer myth 116

effects of providing information 116

implications for ethical consumerism 112–16

importance of context 114

individual-level analysis 115

ineffectiveness of a priori segmentation 114–15

issues addressed 66–7

level of influence of social features 113–14

picture of social consumption 112–16

review of ethical consumerism studies 67–71

experimental study no. 1 72–97

comparison of trade-offs 72–4

discrete choice experimentation (DCE) 72–4

effects of providing information 86, 87

ethical disposition inventory 76–9

experimental approach 72

Forsyth’s ethics position questionnaire 78–9

functionality trade-offs against ethics 77, 94–7

influence of social features on choice 79–86, ,

link between surveys and experiments 87–94, , ,

Machiavellianism scale 76–8

MORI poll 79

product categories 72

structure of the experiment 72

study aims 72

study components 74–9,

study sample 72, 79, 80

survey results and true preferences 87–94, , ,

willingness to consider/purchase 79–86, ,

willingness to pay 79–86, ,

experimental study no. 2 (global segments) 98–112

choice of countries 98

cross-cultural context 98

demographics 99, 100, 106

impact of cultural differences 108–9,

influence of previous purchasing decisions 109–12

latent class (finite mixture) regression analysis 102

product categories 98–9

product features 99–102,

recall of features of previous purchases 109–12

segment size and country differentiation 108–9,

social segment position across product categories 106–7

structure of experiments 102

structure of the study 98–9

study aims 98

study sample 98, 99, 100

Fairtrade movement 3, 11, 19

Forsyth’s ethics position questionnaire (EPQ) 78–9

function

priority over ethics 176

trade-off against ethics 77, 94–7

functional components of value 18–20

G8 133

Gap 1

Germany, cross-cultural research 126–8

Giorgio Armani 1

global segments, experimental study 102–6

Globescan 39

Gore, Al 35, 55–6,

government

desire to pass responsibility to 133

leading social change 35

governmental dependent justifications 126–8

Greening America 168

Greenpeace 31


group, role in social consumption 174–5

guilt, socially induced 20–1

Harrods 30

Heinlein, Robert 166–7, 170

Hollywood Stock Exchange 44

Humane Society 39

Humean approach to decision making 42–3

Huxley, Thomas 184

hybrid automobile market 3

See also Toyota Prius

Ikea 36

image signifier value 19–20

incentive compatibility problem in research 56–7

India, cross-cultural research 128–32

individual level of analysis 115, 174–5

inferences problem in research 58

influence marketing 31

information

as motivation 133

effectiveness of active persuasion 177

effects of providing 86, 87, 116

and ethical consumerism 168–9

ineffectiveness of passive provision 177

intentions

effects of trade-offs 173

increasing predictive validity 59–60

linear model of consumer behavior 48–9, 51

recursive model of consumer behavior 51–3,

International Labour Organization (ILO) 133

International Right to Know campaign 55–6

interpretative research

interpretative approach to CNSR 120–3,

role in understanding CNSR 118–20

Ipsos MORI 39

Kantian approach to decision making 42–3

Kirk, James 47

knowledge and behavior 133

See also information

Kroger 31–2, 36

latent class (finite mixture) regression analysis (LCRA) 102

law of demand and social consumption 175–6

linear model of social consumer behavior 48–51,

logos

See brands and logos

Machiavellianism scale 76–8

market research surveys

a priori segmentation of consumers 53–4

failure to predict purchasing behavior 2–3, 9–13, , 37–40

implications for CNSR 39–40

methodological flaws 56–9

narrowness 8–9

overgeneralization 8–9

possible sources of bias 39

relationship to true preferences 87–94, , ,

See also consumer behavior research, social consumption research

market scenarios, reactions to social consumption 24–8,

McDonald’s 30

measurement, implications of consumer behavior models 53–6

MediaMarkt 31–2

Mill, John Stuart 44

models of consumer behavior

archetypes 41–3

empirical approaches based on 40–1

See also social consumer behavior models

Monsanto 55–6

moral citizen myth 163–5,

MORI poll, use in experimental study 79

motives for apparent ethical consumerism 21–3

MTV 30

Murphy, Thomas 44

myths, and scientific objectivity 185–6

See also ethical consumer

Nader, Ralph 36

Nestlé 28–9

Nike 30, 114

Nokia 31


organic food 19

Oxfam Shop 33

People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) 30, 65–6

persuasion

effectiveness of active persuasion 177

elaboration likelihood model 52

strategies 30–1

Procter & Gamble 28–9

producer surplus 17–18

producers, market scenarios for social consumption 24–8,

product advertising strategies 30

product mix on offer, control of 31–2

product social features, consumer responses to 178–9

Project Red 1–2

protest groups

See activists

pseudo-opinions 58

purchasing (or non-purchasing) behavior

and CNSR 10–11

disconnect with stated preferences 9–13,

quasi-rational co-producer of value model 42, 43

quasi-rational reactive purchaser model 41–2, 43

rational informed processor model 41, 43

recall of features of previous purchases 109–12

recursive model of social consumer behavior 48, 51–3

reputational value 19–20

research

See consumer behavior research, ethical consumption research, market research surveys, social consumption research

See underempirical studies

respondent bias in consumer behavior research 40

retailers, supply chain systems 31–2

revealed social preferences, and CNSR 10–11

Sagan, Carl 186

salience bias in social consumption research 137–9

Saturn 31–2

scientific objectivity, dangers of myths 185–6

Scott, Lee 34

segmentation of consumers from survey information 53–4, 114–15

self-deception 186

self-perception theory 52

Shakespeare, Stephan 2

Shriver, Bobby 1

signal value 19

Singh, Manmohan 133

Smith, Adam 43–4

social change, role of government 35

social component of consumption activity 21–3

social consumer behavior models 48–56

assumptions about how people behave 55–6

consumer-as-voter model 43–6

factors affecting decision making 48

implications of models 53–6

linear model 48–51,

models of what motivates behavior 55–6

recursive model 48, 51–3

and research approach 54–5

segmentation of consumers 53–4

ways to influence behavior 55–6

social consumerism 9–11

and corporate activity 16–28

evolution of 35–6

and firm profitability 16–28

firms’ strategies toward 32–3

See also CNSR (consumer social responsibility)

social consumption

impacts on aggrieved third parties 24–8,

implications of consumer behavior models 43

market response scenarios 24–8,

picture from experimental studies 112–16

potential economic effects on producers 24–8,

reality of 60–3

role of interpretive research 118–20

testing for 21–3

See also CNSR (consumer social responsibility)


social consumption context, influence of corporations 28–35

social consumption rationales 123–32

comparison with the mythical ethical consumer 134–6

developmental realist 128–32

economic rationalist 124–6

governmental dependent 126–8

trends in logic and justification 132–4

social consumption research 56

abstract nature of the context 58–9

attitude–behavior gap 56

citizen-consumer concept 139–40

comparability problem 57–8

comparison with the mythical ethical consumer 134–6

context problem 58–9

cross-cultural consumer depth interviews 120–3,

desire to pass responsibility to authorities 133

effects of trade-offs 137–9

general societal preferences 152–62, , ,

hostility toward social policy initiatives 133–4

implications for CNSR 39–40

inability to predict consumer behavior 37–40

incentive compatibility problem 56–7

increasing the predictive validity of intentions 59–60

inferences problem 58

influence of context 137–9

information not a motivator 133

interpretative approach 120–3,

link between knowledge and behavior 133

linking social and consumer preferences 162–5

measuring social issue priorities 140–52, , , ,

methodological flaws 56–9

possible sources of bias 39

problems related to informational content 57–8,

pseudo-opinions 58

rationales for consumption behaviors 123–32

salience bias 137–9

“social desirability” bias 56–7

trade-offs between social causes 140–52, , , ,

trends in logic and justification 132–4

wording and meaning issues 57–8

See also empirical truths

social features, influence of on choice 79–86, ,

social intent, specific nature of choices 7–8

social issue priorities, measurement 140–52, , , ,

social networks, use in marketing 31

social persuasion, influence on consumers 30–1

social policy initiatives, hostility toward 133–4

social preferences

and CNSR 10–11

linking with consumer preferences 162–5

social segment position across product categories 106–7

social value for the consumer 20–1

socially induced guilt, responses to 20–1

societal preferences, estimation 152–62, , ,

socio-political nature of consumption 163–5,

Sony 28–9

South Park cartoon series 19

Spain, cross-cultural research 124–8,

Starbucks 3, 11, 36

stated social preferences

and CNSR 10–11

disconnect with purchasing behavior 9–13,

status goods 19–20

Stigler, George 167, 171

surveys

See market research surveys

Sweden, cross-cultural research 126–8

Target 31–2

tastes

and consumer choice 166–72

de gustibus non est disputandum 166–72

ethical judgments about 166–8

nature and complexity of 166–72

role of values in determining 171–2

Tesco 31–2, 36

third-party value (TPV), market scenarios 24–8,


Toyota 28–9

Toyota Prius 3, 19–20, 135–6, , 181

trade-offs 8–9, 173

and ethical consumerism 137–9

trade-offs between social causes

estimating general societal preferences 152–62, , ,

individual 140–52, , , ,

truths

See empirical truths

Turkey, cross-cultural research 128–32

unconscious consumption 119

Unilever 28–9, 33, 34–5

University of Iowa, Iowa Electronic Market 44

USA, cross-cultural research 124–6

value

branding 19–20,

changes with market scenarios 24–8,

components of the individual’s valuation equation 18–23

core social value 20

customer value (consumer surplus) 17–18

economic model 17–18

economic profit (producer surplus) 17–18

emotive social value 20–1

functional components 18–20

image signifier 19–20

pure social value 20–1

reputational 19–20

signal value 19

status goods 19–20

willingness to pay 17–23,

values and beliefs

influence of 173–4

interaction with context 173–4

linear model of consumer behavior 48–9,

recursive model of consumer behavior 51–3,

role in consumption decisions 6–7

role in determining tastes 171–2

role of context 7

viral marketing 31

Vogue 30

von Mises, Ludwig 169

Wal-Mart 28–9, 31–2, 34–5, , 36

willingness to consider/purchase, experimental study 79–86, ,

willingness to pay (WTP)

and CNSR 18–23

definition 17–18

experimental study 79–86, ,

World Trade Organization (WTO) 133




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