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Maidens, Meal and Money

Maidens, Meal and Money
Capitalism and the Domestic Community

$27.99 (G)

Part of Themes in the Social Sciences

  • Date Published: April 1981
  • availability: Available
  • format: Paperback
  • isbn: 9780521297080

$ 27.99 (G)
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About the Authors
  • For over twenty years, Claude Meillassoux has been concerned with the study of the different modes of production which existed in Africa prior to colonisation, and the ways in which they responded to colonisation. In this book Professor Meillassoux draws both on his extensive fieldwork in Africa and on the anthropological literature to provide a detailed theoretical analysis of the self-sustaining agricultural community and its articulation with capitalism through the process of colonisation. Using evidence from the usually separated disciplines of ethnology and economics, he explores the major contradiction created by the persistence within the heart of capitalism of the self-sustaining domestic community as a means of reproduction of labour power, and shows that in fact there is a logical connection between the kinship structures which control reproduction in such communities and the forms of exploitation of workers from groups dominated by imperialism. This book offers the elements both of an advanced theory of the domestic mode of production and of a radical critique of classical and structuralist anthropology. just as Professor Meillassoux's earlier work, L'Anthropologie iconomique des Gouro de Côte d'Ivoire was received as a 'turning point in the history of anthropology', this study, which goes beyond a discussion of concepts in an attempt to further the practical steps taken by Marx and Engels, represents a major contribution to the contemporary progress of historical materialism.

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    Product details

    • Date Published: April 1981
    • format: Paperback
    • isbn: 9780521297080
    • length: 212 pages
    • dimensions: 229 x 152 x 12 mm
    • weight: 0.32kg
    • availability: Available
  • Table of Contents

    Preface to the English translation
    Introduction
    Part I: The Domestic Community:
    1. Locating the domestic community
    2. Domestic reproduction
    3. The alimentary structures of kinship
    4. The dialectic of equality
    5. Who are the exploited?
    6. Contradictions and contacts: the premises of inequality
    Part II: The exploitation of the domestic community: imperialism as a mode of reproduction of cheap labour power:
    7. The paradoxes of colonial exploitation
    8. Direct and indirect wages
    9. Primitive accumulation
    10. Without hearth or home: the rural exodus
    11. Periodic migration: the eternal return to the native land
    12. The maintenance of labour-reserves
    13. The double labour market and segregation
    14. The profits from immigration
    15. The limites of the over-exploitation of labour
    Conclusion
    Notes
    References cited
    Index.

  • Author

    Claude Meillassoux

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