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Chapter 2 - The Trouble with Translation: Paratexts and England’s Bestselling New Testament

from I - Europe, England:

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  17 April 2018

Thomas Fulton
Affiliation:
Rutgers University, New Jersey
Kristen Poole
Affiliation:
University of Delaware
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Summary

The second of two chapters providing a general introduction to the bibles of Shakespeare and his contemporaries, this essay investigates a bestselling but vastly overlooked New Testament in England – one that is repackaged and reprinted from the 1550s. In rethinking publication and marketing history, this chapter works to reconstruct the attitudes and preferences that governed Bible-buying and use in early modern England. For understandable reasons, scholars have tended to group Bibles together on the basis of translation, but this has lead to the mistaken sense that translation drove the market, and that readers like Shakespeare were in general attuned to or concerned about differences between them. By examining the record of editions that were published under the monopoly on English Bibles, and by turning to study paratext and packaging, this chapter suggests significant revisions to the way that we understand the relationship between Bible reading, translation, and confessional identity.
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Chapter
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The Bible on the Shakespearean Stage
Cultures of Interpretation in Reformation England
, pp. 33 - 48
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2018

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