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3 - Econometrics

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  21 September 2017

Mark Bevir
Affiliation:
University of California, Berkeley
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Modernism and the Social Sciences
Anglo-American Exchanges, c.1918–1980
, pp. 39 - 76
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2017

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  • Econometrics
  • Edited by Mark Bevir, University of California, Berkeley
  • Book: Modernism and the Social Sciences
  • Online publication: 21 September 2017
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781316795514.003
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  • Econometrics
  • Edited by Mark Bevir, University of California, Berkeley
  • Book: Modernism and the Social Sciences
  • Online publication: 21 September 2017
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781316795514.003
Available formats
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  • Econometrics
  • Edited by Mark Bevir, University of California, Berkeley
  • Book: Modernism and the Social Sciences
  • Online publication: 21 September 2017
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781316795514.003
Available formats
×