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2 - Exploring the new cleavage across arenas and public debates: design and methods

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 August 2012

Hanspeter Kriesi
Affiliation:
Universität Zürich
Edgar Grande
Affiliation:
Universität Munchen
Martin Dolezal
Affiliation:
Austrian National Election Study (AUTNES)
Marc Helbling
Affiliation:
Wissenschaftszentrum Berlin für Sozialforschung
Dominic Höglinger
Affiliation:
Universität Zürich
Swen Hutter
Affiliation:
Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität Munchen
Bruno Wüest
Affiliation:
Universität Zürich
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Summary

Introduction

This volume is a continuation and extension of our previous study on West European politics in the age of globalization (Kriesi et al. 2008). Aspects of continuity prevail with respect to the main theoretical questions introduced in Chapter 1, but we now analyse how the integration–demarcation cleavage manifests itself in various political arenas. We extend the research design as well as the empirical programme to include elections to the European Parliament and non-institutionalized forms of political participation, hence political protest, in the analysis. Furthermore, we have updated our data on national elections, and we scrutinize public debates about the three issues central to globalization processes: immigration, economic liberalization, and European integration.

We primarily deal with the programmes political and other actors offer, and hence with the supply side; our analysis of citizens' attitudes is restricted to Chapter 3. As we rely on secondary data sources and common statistical procedures to explore demand, the chapter at hand focuses on the most important aspects of how we study the supply side of political competition. However, the expression of protest transcends this dichotomy somewhat, as our analysis of political protest is neither wholly supply-oriented nor entirely demand-oriented.

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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2012

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