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Group cognitive–behavioural therapy for anxiety and depression

  • Graeme Whitfield
Summary

Cognitive–behavioural therapy (CBT) is a psychological treatment approach that can be delivered not only on a one-to-one basis but also to groups and in self-help formats. However, the evidence base supporting individual CBT is more extensive than the research regarding group CBT. This is likely to influence the choice of services that develop in the Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) programme for the treatment of depression and anxiety disorders in primary care in England. This article outlines the different forms that group CBT takes, the way in which it may benefit people and the current evidence base supporting its use for anxiety and depression. It also outlines the advantages of group or individual CBT and describes those patients who appear to be best suited to a specific delivery.

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Copyright
Corresponding author
Dr Graeme Whitfield, Department of CBT, c/o George Hine House, Gipsy Lane, Leicester LE5 0TD, UK. Email: graeme.whitfield@leicspart.nhs.uk.
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Declaration of Interest

None.

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References
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BJPsych Advances
  • ISSN: 1355-5146
  • EISSN: 1472-1481
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Group cognitive–behavioural therapy for anxiety and depression

  • Graeme Whitfield
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