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Anthropology and Africa—A Wider Perspective1

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Anthropological research in Africa has been characterized by an intensive, microethnographic approach, which has stressed the understanding of institutional arrangements and their functioning within a given society; and, exceptionally, the analysis of custom in depth. Comparisons have been eschewed, while the broader distributional studies that played an important role in the earlier researches of anthropologists in North America and Polynesia, in Africa have been all but lacking in the scientific literature. The result has typically been the ethnographic monograph rather than the ethnological or ethnohistorical study.

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page 225 note 1 The 1959 Lugard Memorial Lecture was delivered by Professor Herskovits in London on 6 April 1959, on the occasion of the annual Meeting of the Executive Council of the Institute. [Ed.]

page 226 note 1 Herskovits M. J., ‘A Preliminary Considers-tion of the Culture Areas of Africa, American Anthropologist, vol. xxvi, 1924, pp. 5063 (revised as ‘The Culture Areas of Africa’, Africa, vol. iii, 1930, pp. 5977).

page 227 note 1 Herskovits M. J., ‘Peoples and Cultures of Sub-Saharan Africa’, The Annals, American Acad. and Soc. Sci., vol. ccxcviii, 1955, pp. 1120.

page 227 note 2 Schapera I., The Khoisan Peoples of South Africa, London, 1930.

page 227 note 3 Lindblom G. R.(ed.), Smärra Meddelanden, Stockholm Etnografiska Museum, 1926 and later.

page 227 note 4 Meinhof Carl, Die Sprachen der Hamiten, Ham-burg, 1912.

page 227 note 5 Westermann D., Die Sudansprachen, eine sprach-vergleichende Studie, Hamburg, 1911.

page 227 note 6 Werner Alice, Structure and Relationship of African Languages, London, 1930.

page 227 note 7 Greenberg J. H., Studies in African Linguistic Classification, New Haven (Conn.), 1955.

page 227 note 8 Olbrechts Franz M., Plastiek van Kongo, Antwerp, 1946.

page 227 note 9 Wingert Paul S., The Sculpture of Negro Africa, New York, 1950.

page 227 note 10 Fagg William, in The Sculpture of Africa, by Elisofon E., London, 1958, passim.

page 227 note 11 Merriam A. M., ‘African Music’, in Continuity and Change in African Cultures (Bascom W. R. and Herskovits M. J., eds.), Chicago, 1959, pp. 4986.

page 227 note 12 Richards A. I., ‘Some Types of Family Structure amongst the Central Bantu’, in African Systems of Kinship and Marriage (Radcliffe-Brown A. R. and Forde D., eds.), London, 1950, pp. 207–51.

page 228 note 1 Fortes M. and Evans-Pritchard E. E. (eds.), African Political Systems, London, 1940.

page 228 note 2 Mair Lucy, ‘African Chiefs Today’, Africa, vol. xxviii, 1958, pp. 195205.

page 229 note 1 Johnston Sir Harry H., ‘A Survey of the Ethnography of Africa, and the former Racial and Tribal Migrations on that Continent’, Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute, vol. xliii, 1913, pp. 574–412.

page 229 note 2 Sanson N., L'Afrique en Plusieurs Cartes Nouvelles, et Exactes; et en Divers Traictés de Géographie, de l'Histoire …, Paris, 1656, p. 1 of sig. A.

page 231 note 1 Hodgen M. J., Change and History (Viking Fund Publications in Anthropology, No. 18), New York, 1952.

page 231 note 2 Sapir E., ‘Time Perspective in Aboriginal American Culture, A Study in Method’, Memoir 90 (No. 13, Anthropological Series), Canadian Geological Survey, Ottawa, 1916 (reprinted in Selected Writings of Edward Sapir, D. G. Mandelbaum, ed., Berkeley, 1949. PP 398–462).

page 231 note 3 Spier L., ‘The Sun Dance of the Plains Indians;Its Development and Diffusion’, Anthro. Papers, American Museum of Natural History, vol. xvi, part 7, 1921, pp. 451527.

page 231 note 4 Jones D.H.,‘Report of the Second Conference on History and Archaeology in Africa’, Africa, vol. xxviii, 1958, pp. 5758.

page 232 note 1 Mention should be made of the journal Ethno-history, published by Indiana University, and spon-sored by the American Ethnohistoric Conference. It is concerned primarily with studies of early American Indian-White acculturation, relating historical documents to the ethnographic data, with occasional reference to archaeological findings.

page 232 note 2 Goody Jack, ‘Ethnohistory and the Akan of Ghana’, Africa, vol. xxix, 1959, pp. 6780.

page 235 note 1 Herskovits M. J.,‘Some Thoughts on American Research in Africa’, African Studies Bulletin, vol. 1, no. 1, 1958, p. 9.

page 236 note 1 Sundkler Bengt G. M., Bantu Prophets in South Africa, London, 1948.

page 236 note 2 Shepperson George, and Price Thomas, inde-pendent African, John Chilembwe and the Nyasaland Rising of 1915, Edinburgh, 1958.

page 236 note 3 Balandier G., Sociologie actuelk dt I'Noire, Paris, 1955.

page 236 note 4 Messenger John C. Jr., ‘Religious Acculturation among the Anang Ibibio’, in Continuity and Change in African Cultures (Bascom W. R. and Herskovits M.J., eds.), Chicago, 1959, pp. 279–99.

page 236 note 5 Hodgkin Thomas, Nationalism in Colonial Africa, London, 1956.

1 The 1959 Lugard Memorial Lecture was delivered by Professor Herskovits in London on 6 April 1959, on the occasion of the annual Meeting of the Executive Council of the Institute. [Ed.]

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Africa
  • ISSN: 0001-9720
  • EISSN: 1750-0184
  • URL: /core/journals/africa
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