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Introduction to the Symposium on the American Convention on Human Rights and its New Interlocutors

  • Jorge Contesse (a1) and Alexandra Huneeus (a2)
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This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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1 The American Convention on Human Rights was adopted in November 22, 1969.

2 Jorge Contesse, Resisting the Inter-American Human Rights System, 44 Yale J. Int'l L. 179 (2019); Alexandra Huneeus & René Urueña, Treaty Exit and Latin America's Constitutional Courts, 111 AJIL Unbound 456 (2017); Ximena Soley & Silvia Steininger, Parting Ways or Lashing Back? Withdrawals, Backlash and the Inter-American Court of Human Rights, 14 Int'l J.L. Context 237 (2018).

3 There is never a lack of those who clamor that there is a crisis afoot in the IAS. See Eduardo Ferrer, “La Corte Interamericana Siempre ha Vivido en Crisis”, El Pais (July 24, 2018) (recording the President of the Inter-American Court affirming that the Court has always been in crisis, which is also to say that there is nothing particularly unusual in the Court's current situation). For an example of a similar sense of crisis from an earlier era, see El Futuro del Sistema Interamericano de Protección de los Derechos Humanos (Juan Méndez & Francisco Cox eds., 1998).

4 Alexandra Huneeus, Constitutional Lawyers and the Varied Authority of the Inter-American Court, 79 L. & Contemp. Probs. 179 (2016).

5 Ximena Soley, The Crucial Role of Human Rights NGOs in the Inter-American System, 113 AJIL Unbound 355 (2019).

6 Id. at 355.

7 See Atala Riffo and Daughters v. Chile, Merits, Reparations, and Costs, Judgment, Inter-Am. Ct. H.R. (ser. C) No. 239 (Feb. 24, 2012); Duque v. Colombia, Preliminary Objections, Merits, Reparations, and Costs, Judgment, Inter-Am. Ct. H.R. (ser. C) No. 310 (Feb. 26, 2016); Flor Freire v. Ecuador, Preliminary Exceptions, Merits, Reparations and Costs, Inter-Am. Ct. H.R. (ser. C) No. 315 (Aug. 31, 2016); State Obligations Concerning Change of Name, Gender Identity, and Rights Derived from a Relationship Between Same-Sex Couples (Interpretation and Scope of Articles 1(1), 3, 7, 11(2), 13, 17, 18 and 24, In Relation to Article 1, of the American Convention on Human Rights), Advisory Opinion OC-24/17, Inter-Am. Ct. H.R. (ser. A) No. 24 (Nov. 24, 2017); Artavia Murillo and Others v. Costa Rica (“In Vitro Fertilization”), Preliminary Objections, Merits, Reparations and Costs, Judgment, Inter-Am. Ct. H.R. (ser. C) No. 257 (Nov. 28, 2012).

8 Rene Urueña, Evangelicals at the Inter-American Court of Human Rights, 113 AJIL Unbound 360 (2019).

9 Id. at 360.

10 González and Others (“Cotton Field”) v. Mexico, Preliminary Objection, Merits, Reparations, and Costs, Judgment, Inter-Am. Ct. H.R. (ser. C) No. 205 (Nov. 16, 2009).

13 Jorge Contesse, Conservative Governments and Latin America's Human Rights Landscape, 113 AJIL Unbound 375 (2019).

14 Alexandra Huneeus, When Illiberals Embrace Human Rights, 113 AJIL Unbound 380 (2019).

15 Id.

Introduction to the Symposium on the American Convention on Human Rights and its New Interlocutors

  • Jorge Contesse (a1) and Alexandra Huneeus (a2)

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