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Efficacy of two different types of speech therapy for aphasic stroke patients

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  28 November 2008

R. S. Prins*
Affiliation:
Institute for General Linguistics, University of Amsterdam
R. Schoonen
Affiliation:
Institute for General Linguistics, University of Amsterdam
J. Vermeulen
Affiliation:
Aphasia Center, St. Lucas Hospital, Amsterdam
*
R. S. Prins, Institute for General Linguistics, Spuistraat 210, 1012 VT Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Abstract

The influence of two different types of language therapy was investigated by assigning 32 patients to three groups: 10 patients were treated with a Systematic Therapy program for Auditory Comprehension Disorders (group 1), 11 patients received conventional stimulation therapy (group 2), and the other 11 patients received no treatment at all (group 3). Language recovery in the three groups was examined with a test battery consisting of two parts: Part I consisted of 3 subtests for auditory comprehension, which were also used as practice materials in the treatment program given to the patients of group 1; Part II contained 8 tests for auditory comprehension, reading comprehension, and oral expression, the items of which were not used as practice materials in either of the two treated groups. Although the influence of age, time post onset, and severity of the receptive disorder were controlled by multiple regression analysis, it was found that the differences between the three treatment conditions were far from significant on almost all evaluation tests of Part II, as well as on the evaluation tests of Part I. On the basis of these results it was concluded that neither the Systematic Therapy program for Auditory Comprehension Disorders nor the conventional stimulation therapy had any clear effect on the recovery process of the treated patients in groups 1 and 2. Some possible reasons for the failure to demonstrate significant differences in language gains between the three therapeutic conditions are discussed.

Type
Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1989

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References

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