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    Fidorra, Jason C. Frederick, Peter C. Evers, David C. and Meyer, Kenneth D. 2016. Selection of human-influenced and natural wetlands by Great Egrets at multiple scales in the southeastern USA. The Condor, Vol. 118, Issue. 1, p. 46.


    Sundar, K. S. Gopi Clancy, Greg P. and Shah, Nita 2006. Factors affecting formation of flocks of unusual size and composition in Black-necked Storks (Ephippiorhynchus asiaticus) in Australia and India. Emu, Vol. 106, Issue. 3, p. 253.


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Group size and habitat use by Black-necked Storks Ephippiorhynchus asiaticus in an agriculture-dominated landscape in Uttar Pradesh, India

  • K. S. GOPI SUNDAR (a1) (a2)
  • DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0959270904000358
  • Published online: 25 November 2004
Abstract

Group size and habitat use of Black-necked Storks Ephippiorhynchus asiaticus were studied over a 30-month period in an unprotected landscape with a mosaic of natural and manmade features in Etawah and Mainpuri districts, Uttar Pradesh, India. Group size was largely one or two and never more than a family of two adults and three young. Group size did not change with season or across habitat types. Black-necked Storks used habitats to different extents across years and seasons. Wetlands were preferred in all seasons and rice-paddies were preferred during the monsoon. The use of irrigation canals was consistent across seasons and was always in proportion to their availability. Irrigation canals and crop-fields, particularly flooded rice-fields, provided some additional habitat to Black-necked Storks, but catered to the population for a very small period of time. While some studies have demonstrated that flooded rice-fields are useful for wintering waterbird species, conversion of natural wetlands to crop-fields will not be advantageous to Black-necked Storks, and these habitats need to be preserved to conserve the species.

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Bird Conservation International
  • ISSN: 0959-2709
  • EISSN: 1474-0001
  • URL: /core/journals/bird-conservation-international
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