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Genetic differentiation among various populations of the diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella Lepidoptera Yponomeutidae

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  09 March 2007

A. Pichon
Affiliation:
Laboratoire dynamique de la biodiversité, UMR UPS/CNRS 5172, Université Paul Sabatier, 118 route de Narbonne, 31062 Toulouse Cedex 4, France
L. Arvanitakis
Affiliation:
CIRAD/AMIS, Laboratoire Entotrop, CSIRO Campus International de Baillarguet, TA 40/L, 34398 Montpellier Cedex 5, France
O. Roux
Affiliation:
Laboratoire dynamique de la biodiversité, UMR UPS/CNRS 5172, Université Paul Sabatier, 118 route de Narbonne, 31062 Toulouse Cedex 4, France
A.A. Kirk
Affiliation:
USDA/ARS, European Biological Control Laboratory, Montferrier sur Lez, 34398 St Gély du Fesc, France
C. Alauzet
Affiliation:
Laboratoire dynamique de la biodiversité, UMR UPS/CNRS 5172, Université Paul Sabatier, 118 route de Narbonne, 31062 Toulouse Cedex 4, France
D. Bordat
Affiliation:
CIRAD/AMIS, Laboratoire Entotrop, CSIRO Campus International de Baillarguet, TA 40/L, 34398 Montpellier Cedex 5, France
L. Legal*
Affiliation:
Laboratoire dynamique de la biodiversité, UMR UPS/CNRS 5172, Université Paul Sabatier, 118 route de Narbonne, 31062 Toulouse Cedex 4, France
*
*Fax 00 33 0 5 61 55 61 96 E-mail: legal@cict.fr

Abstract

Genetic variation among 14 populations of Plutella xylostella (Linnaeus) from USA (Geneva, New York), Brazil (Brasilia), Japan (Okayama), The Philippines (Caragan de Oyo), Uzbekistan (Tashkent), France (Montpellier), Benin (Cotonou), South Africa (Johannesburg), Réunion Island (Montvert), and five localities in Australia (Adelaide, Brisbane, Mareeba, Melbourne, Sydney) were assessed by analysis of allozyme frequencies at seven polymorphic loci. Most of the populations were not in Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium and had a deficit in heterozygotes. The global differentiation among populations was estimated by the fixation index (Fst) at 0.103 for the 14 populations and at 0.047 when populations from Australia and Japan, which differed most and had a strong genetic structure, were excluded from the analysis. By contrast, the populations from Benin (West Africa) and Brazil (South America) were very similar to each other. Genetic differentiation among the populations was not correlated with geographical distance.

Type
Review Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2006

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