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How Much Influence Do Various Members Have within Research Ethics Committees?

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  29 July 2009

Paul M. McNeill
Affiliation:
An associate professor in the School of Community Medicine, University of New South Wales, Australia, where he teaches law and ethics to medical students, has been studying research ethics committees and hospital ethics committees, and recently wrote The Ethics and Politics of Human Experimentation
Catherine A. Berglund
Affiliation:
An associate fellow in the Science and Technology Studies Department, University of Wollongong, Australia
Ian W. Webster
Affiliation:
Professor of Public Health and chairman of the Faculty of Medicine at the University of New South Wales, Australia,

Extract

Throughout the world, research ethics committees are relied on to prevent unethical research and protect research subjects. Given that reliance, the composition of committees and the manner in which decisions are arrived at by committee members is of critical importance. There have been Instances in which an inadequate review process has resulted in serious harm to research subjects. Deficient committee review was identified as one of the factors In a study in New Zealand which resulted in the suffering and death of many women diagnosed with carcinoma in situ.

Type
Special Section: Research Ethics: Ethics at the Borders of Medical Research
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1994

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References

Notes

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44. See note 10. McNeill, et al. 1990; 152:291.Google Scholar

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