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Guest Editorial: Encouraging the Dialogue

Abstract

Ethics consultation is the most engaged aspect of clinical ethics, a field focused on ethical issues, questions, and conflicts arising in the course of patient care and delivery of healthcare services. Despite the skepticism of some academic bioethicists and criticism expressed by social commentators, clinical ethics, which began in North America, has expanded to Europe and many other parts of the world with the proliferation of healthcare institution ethics and ethics consultation support services. Along with the development and implementation of ethics policies and guidelines for patient care through work on hospital ethics committees, clinical ethicists are increasingly involved in the ethics of healthcare organizational structures and processes and the day to day provision of ethics consultative services to health professionals, patients, and families.

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References
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3. This conference in Basel was part of a series of International Conferences on Clinical Ethics and Consultation (ICCEC) that began in Cleveland, Ohio, April 4–6, 2003, followed by a meeting held in conjunction with the Canadian Bioethics Society in Toronto, Canada, on June 1–3, 2007; in 2008 the series continued with a conference in Rijeka, Croatia, September 4, 2008, in conjunction with the Ninth World Congress of Bioethics.

4. Reiter-Theil S, Agich GJ, eds. Thematic section on research on clinical ethics and consultation. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy. A European Journal 2008;11(1):3–42.

5. Agich GJ, Spielman B. Ethics expert testimony: Against the skeptics. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 1997;22:381–403. See note 1, Avorn 1982, Beauchamp 1982, and Noble 1982; Paris JJ. An ethicist takes the stand, Hastings Center Report 1984;14(1):32–3; Pellegrino ED, Sharpe VA. Medical ethics in the courtroom: The need for scrutiny. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 1989;32:547–64; Sharpe VA, Pellegrino ED. Medical ethics in the courtroom: A reappraisal. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 1997;22(4):373–9; Spielman B, Agich GJ. The future of bioethics testimony: Guidelines for determining qualifications, reliability, and helpfulness. San Diego Law Review 1999;36(4):1043–75. Also see note 1, Singer 1988, Wikler 1982, and Wildes 1997.

6. Agich GJ. Joining the team: Ethics consultation at the Cleveland Clinic. HEC Forum 2003;15(4):310–22.

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Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics
  • ISSN: 0963-1801
  • EISSN: 1469-2147
  • URL: /core/journals/cambridge-quarterly-of-healthcare-ethics
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