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STOCHASTIC ANALYSIS FOR THE DESCRIPTION AND SYNTHESIS OF PREDATOR–PREY SYSTEMS*

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 May 2012

Guy L. Curry
Affiliation:
Biosystems Research Group, Department of Industrial and Bioengineering, Texas A'M University
Don W. DeMichele
Affiliation:
Biosystems Research Group, Department of Industrial and Bioengineering, Texas A'M University

Abstract

In this paper, a stochastic analysis approach for predator–prey systems modeling is developed. The states of the system are assumed to have a natural probabilistic variation. Elements of queueing theory are used to describe these variations and to obtain both the transient and steady-state results for the system. The predator is considered analogous to a service facility and the prey as customers to be served. The Holling disk equation and mantid–fly experiments are analyzed by this approach. The method provides a framework for a straightforward synthesis of the system components and is readily generalized for multiple predator systems. Furthermore, hunger and other behavioral aspects can be easily incorporated into the mathematical analysis.

Type
Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Entomological Society of Canada 1977

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