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Implementing peer review at an emergency medicine blog: bridging the gap between educators and clinical experts

  • Brent Thoma (a1) (a2) (a3), Teresa Chan (a3) (a4) (a5), Natalie Desouza (a6) and Michelle Lin (a3) (a6)
Abstract

Emergency physicians are leaders in the ‘‘free open-access meducation’’ (FOAM) movement. The mandate of FOAM is to create open-access education and knowledge translation resources for trainees and practicing physicians (e.g., blogs, podcasts, and vodcasts). Critics of FOAM have suggested that because such resources can be easily published online without quality control mechanisms, unreviewed FOAM resources may be erroneous or biased. We present a new initiative to incorporate open, expert, peer review into an established academic medical blog. Experts provided either pre- or postpublication reviews that were visible to blog readers. This article outlines the details of this initiative and discusses the potentially transformative impact of this educational innovation.

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Copyright
Corresponding author
Correspondence to: Dr. Brent Thoma, EM Residency Training Program, Room 2686 Royal University Hospital, 103 Hospital Drive, Saskatoon, SK S7N 0W8; brent.thoma@usask.ca
References
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1. Nickson, CP, Cadogan, MD. Free Open Access Medical education (FOAM) for the emergency physician. Emergency Medicine Australasia 2014;26:7683; Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/1742-6723.12191/abstract (accessed February 4, 2013).
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3. Davis, D, Evans, M, Jadad, A, et al. The case for knowledge translation: shortening the journey from evidence to effect. BMJ 2003;327:3335, doi:10.1136/bmj.327.7405.33.
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6. Lin, M. Discussing Annals EM article: social media and physician learning. Acad Life Emerg Med. Available at:http://academiclifeinem.com/discussing-annals-em-article-socialmedia-and-physician-learning/ (accessed November 5, 2013).
7. Lin, M. Trick of the trade: urine pregnancy test without urine. Acad Life Emerg Med. Available at: http://academiclifeinem.com/trick-of-the-trade-urine-pregnancy-testwithout-urine/ (accessed November 5, 2013).
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Canadian Journal of Emergency Medicine
  • ISSN: -
  • EISSN: 1481-8035
  • URL: /core/journals/canadian-journal-of-emergency-medicine
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