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MOVEMENT INTERSECTIONALITY: The Case of Race, Gender, Disability, and Genetic Technologies

  • Dorothy Roberts (a1) and Sujatha Jesudason (a2)
Abstract

Intersectional analysis need not focus solely on differences within or between identity-based groups. Using intersectionality for cross movement mobilization reveals that, contrary to criticism for being divisive, attention to intersecting identities has the potential to create solidarity and cohesion. In this article, we elaborate this argument with a case study of the intersection of race, gender, and disability in genetic technologies as well as in organizing to promote a social justice approach to the use of these technologies. We show how organizing based on an intersectional analysis can help forge alliances between reproductive justice, racial justice, women's rights, and disability rights activists to develop strategies to address reproductive genetic technologies. We use the work of Generations Ahead to illuminate how intersectionality applied at the movement-building level can identify genuine common ground, create authentic alliances, and more effectively advocate for shared policy priorities.

Copyright
Corresponding author
Dorothy Roberts, University of Pennsylvania Law School, 3501 Sansom Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104. E-mail: dorothyroberts@law.upenn.edu
References
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Du Bois Review: Social Science Research on Race
  • ISSN: 1742-058X
  • EISSN: 1742-0598
  • URL: /core/journals/du-bois-review-social-science-research-on-race
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