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Del Norte Meets Little Saigon: Ethnic Entrepreneurship on Broadway Avenue in Wichita, Kansas, 1970–2015

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  29 March 2017

JAY M. PRICE
Affiliation:
Jay M. Price directs the Local and Community History Program at Wichita State University. His major publications include Temples for a Modern God: Religious Architecture in Postwar America and Gateways to the Southwest: The Story of Arizona State Parks. His other research has included books, articles, documentaries, talks, and exhibits that cover aspects of the local and regional story, including the history of the Lebanese community, the African American community, aviation, ethnic entrepreneurship, Tornado Alley, the oil industry, the Cherokee Strip, local rock bands, religious architecture, and regional identity. Several of these projects have involved students who serve as co-authors and co-researchers. E-mail: jay.price@wichita.edu
SUE ABDINNOUR
Affiliation:
Sue Abdinnour is Omer Professor and Kansas Faculty of Distinction in the Barton School of Business at Wichita State University, where she has been teaching at the undergraduate and the graduate levels since 1998. She received her Ph.D. from Indiana University, Bloomington, and her M.Sc. from University of Southampton, UK. Her research interests include operations management, business modeling, information systems, and ethnic entrepreneurship. She publishes her research in elite academic and practitioner journals, such as Decision Sciences Journal and European Journal of Operations Research. She also consults with local businesses and trains executive professionals on various topics, including operations management strategy, lean principles, quality control, and capacity planning. E-mail: sue.abdinnour@wichita.edu
DAVID T. HUGHES
Affiliation:
David T. Hughes in an anthropological archeologist at Wichita State University; his primary focus has been on prehistoric trade and exchange networks across the southern Great Plains of the United States. His somewhat eclectic career as a field scientist has led him to explore Pleistocene Mammoth remains, middle-prehistoric bison kill sites, and late prehistoric village period sites (see www.texasbeyondhistory.net/villagers/buriedcity/index.html). He has also worked on ethnographic overviews of the Pipestone Quarries in Minnesota and the Agate Fossil Beds/Scotts Bluff National Monument. Over the past few years, he has begun to combine these disparate interests through analysis with geographic information systems, and was instrumental in beginning a GIS program at WSU. E-mail: david.hughes@wichita.edu

Abstract

Since the 1970s, a stretch of Broadway Avenue in Wichita, Kansas, has seen the growth of both Latino and Asian businesses. Using mapping, data analysis, and historical research, this study compares the growth of ethnic entrepreneurship between both populations. The results not only reveal similarities but also illustrate the degree to which ethnic entrepreneurship varies, depending on a population’s situation in a given location.

Type
Articles
Copyright
Copyright © The Author 2017. Published by Cambridge University Press on behalf of the Business History Conference. All rights reserved. 

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References

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De Hoyos, Jorge. “Connie’s Mexico Cafe Serves Authentic Food at Low Prices.” Wichita Eagle, June 12, 2014.Google Scholar
Duran, Alicia. “India’s Diaspora in Wichita: An East Indian’s Journey to the Land of ‘Oz.’” Wichita Islamic Society, http://www.myisw.org (see History web page).Google Scholar
Garrett-Scott, Shennette. “To Do a Work That Would Be Very Far Reaching: Minnie Geddings Cox, the Mississippi Life Insurance Company, and the Challenges of Black Women’s Business Leadership in the Early Twentieth-Century United States.” Enterprise & Society 17 (September 2016): 473514.Google Scholar
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Heck, Josh. “Wichita’s Nomar International Plaza Opens.” Wichita Business Journal, April 29, 2011.Google Scholar
Horwath, Bryan. “Hispanic Community Could Be Sleeping Giant.” Wichita Eagle, March 9, 2016.Google Scholar
Lessner, Lori. “Planning the Area’s Growth.” Wichita Eagle, April 18, 1999.Google Scholar
Lunday, Sarah. “Hispanic-Owned Business Numbers Surge. National Associations Say the Sharp Increase in Hispanic Businesses is Showing No Sign of Letting Up.” Wichita Eagle, May 4, 1997.Google Scholar
Mann, Fred. “2010 Census Figures: A More Diverse Kansas—Racial, Ethnic Profile Dramatically Changes.” Wichita Eagle, May 4, 2011.Google Scholar
Martell, Lillian Zier. “Here We Grow: Whether We Favor Older Urban Neighborhoods or Expansive Suburban Lots, Our Choices Are Shaping the Way Wichita Grows.” Wichita Eagle, August 6, 2000.Google Scholar
McCormick, Mark. “Are You Ready for a New Reality? Wichita Magazine, November 1, 2014, www.wichitamag.com/blogsearch/issues/0211/are-you-ready-new-reality.Google Scholar
McCurry, Rhonda. “23 Years of Mexican Cooking.” Wichita Eagle, December 25, 2008.Google Scholar
McMillan, Molly. “Asian Shopping Center a First for Wichita.” Wichita Eagle, November 13, 1995.Google Scholar
Neil, Denise. “Connie’s Mexico Cafe Celebrates 50 Years in Business.” Wichita Eagle, April 24, 2013.Google Scholar
Neil, Denise. “Cortez Mexican Restaurant to Celebrate 30th Anniversary.” Wichita Eagle, June 17, 2015.Google Scholar
Neil, Denise. “Cortez Mexican Restaurant Could Close If Business Does Not Improve.” Wichita Eagle, January 8, 2015.Google Scholar
Neil, Denise. “Doc’s Steak House Will Close in October After 62 Years in Business.” Wichita Eagle, September 18, 2014.Google Scholar
Olegario, Rowena. “‘That Mysterious People’: Jewish Merchants, Transparency, and Community in Mid-Nineteenth Century America.” Business History Review 73 (Summer 1999): 161189.Google Scholar
Partnership for a New American Economy. “The New American Fortune 500.” Partnership for a New American Economy, June 2011.Google Scholar
Pollak, Oliver B. “The Jewish Peddlers of Omaha.” Nebraska History 63 (December 1982): 474501.Google Scholar
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