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Characterisation of invasive clinical Haemophilus influenzae isolates in Queensland, Australia using whole-genome sequencing

  • M. STAPLES (a1), R. M. A. GRAHAM (a1) and A. V. JENNISON (a1)

Summary

Haemophilus influenzae is an important aetiological organism of both adult and child respiratory disease. The number of non-typeable (NTHi) invasive H. influenzae isolates referred to the Queensland (QLD) Public Health Microbiology laboratory has increased notably year-by-year. In this study we used whole-genome sequencing to molecularly characterise 100 referred invasive H. influenzae, including 74 NTHi isolates over a 15-year period, observing the carriage of capsular and putative virulence genes, including the major adhesins, antimicrobial resistance genes and population diversity. Encapsulated isolates were largely clonal, however NTHi isolates displayed high genetic variability by MLST and single nucleotide polymorphism typing with no dominant clone observed. The only mechanism for β-lactam resistance identified in the QLD isolates was β-lactamase production. No single set of virulence determinants was conclusively associated with invasive QLD NTHi isolates.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

*Author for correspondence: M. Staples, Queensland Department of Health, Public Health Microbiology, Forensic and Scientific Services, Health Support Queensland, PO Box 594, Archerfield 4108, QLD, Australia. (Email: megan.staples@health.qld.gov.au)

References

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