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Distribution and risk factors of Trichomonas vaginalis infection in England: an epidemiological study using electronic health records from sexually transmitted infection clinics, 2009–2011

  • H. D. MITCHELL (a1), D. A. LEWIS (a2) (a3), K. MARSH (a1) and G. HUGHES (a1)

Summary

We used data from the Genitourinary Medicine Clinic Activity Dataset (GUMCAD) over a 3-year period (2009–2011) to investigate the distribution and risk factors of Trichomonas vaginalis infection in England. Socio-demographic and clinical risk factors associated with a diagnosis of T. vaginalis were explored using multivariable logistic regression. Rates of T. vaginalis infection were highest in London and the West Midlands. For men and women, T. vaginalis infection was significantly associated with: older age compared to those aged 20–24 years, non-white ethnicity (in particular black Caribbean and black ‘other’ ethnic groups), and birth in the Caribbean vs. birth in the UK. Current gonorrhoea or chlamydia infection was associated with a diagnosis of T. vaginalis in women. Further research is required to assess the public health impact and cost-effectiveness of introducing targeted screening for women at high risk of infection in areas of higher prevalence.

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      Distribution and risk factors of Trichomonas vaginalis infection in England: an epidemiological study using electronic health records from sexually transmitted infection clinics, 2009–2011
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      Distribution and risk factors of Trichomonas vaginalis infection in England: an epidemiological study using electronic health records from sexually transmitted infection clinics, 2009–2011
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Copyright

Corresponding author

*Author for correspondence: Miss H. D. Mitchell, HIV & STI Department, Centre for Infectious Disease Surveillance and Control, Public Health England, 61 Colindale Avenue, London NW9 5EQ, UK. (Email: holly.mitchell@phe.gov.uk)

References

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