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The faecal flora of children in the United Kingdom

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 May 2009

R. B. Ellis-Pegler
Affiliation:
Communicable Diseases Unit, St George's Hospital, London SW 17 0QT
C. Crabtree
Affiliation:
Communicable Diseases Unit, St George's Hospital, London SW 17 0QT
H. P. Lambert
Affiliation:
Communicable Diseases Unit, St George's Hospital, London SW 17 0QT
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The faecal flora of 55 children (aged 8 days to 8 years) and 16 adults was determined. All the children were artificially fed from birth. The faecal flora of the youngest age group was generally less complex and less predictable than that of adults. Some bacterial groups commonly found in adult stools, for example bacilli, lactobacilli and yeasts, were rarely found in the youngest infants. Most of the changes towards the adult pattern took place between 4 and 12 months. The faecal flora of children aged 1–4 years generally resembled that of adults, although lactobacilli were still infrequently isolated.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1975

References

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