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RtoP Alive and Well after Libya

Abstract

With the exception of Raphael Lemkin's efforts on behalf of the 1948 Genocide Convention, no idea has moved faster in the international normative arena than “the responsibility to protect” (RtoP), which was formulated in 2001 by the International Commission on Intervention and State Sovereignty (ICISS). Friends and foes have pointed to the commission's conceptual contribution to reframing sovereignty as contingent rather than absolute, and to establishing a framework for forestalling or stopping mass atrocities via a three-pronged responsibility—to prevent, to react, and to rebuild. But until the international military action against Libya in March 2011, the sharp end of the RtoP stick—the use of military force—had been replaced by evasiveness and skittishness from diplomats, scholars, and policy analysts.

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Alan J. Kuperman , “The Moral Hazard of Humanitarian Intervention: Lessons from the Balkans,” International Studies Quarterly 52 (2008), pp. 4980

Alan J. Kuperman , “Darfur: Strategic Victimhood Strikes Again?Genocide Studies and Prevention 4, no. 3 (2009), pp. 281303

Kwame Akonor , “Assessing the African Union's Right of Humanitarian Intervention,Criminal Justice Ethics 29, no. 2 (2010), pp. 157–73

Rama Mani and Thomas G. Weiss , eds., The Responsibility to Protect: Cultural Perspectives in the Global South (London: Routledge, 2011)

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Ethics & International Affairs
  • ISSN: 0892-6794
  • EISSN: 1747-7093
  • URL: /core/journals/ethics-and-international-affairs
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