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CRUDE PROTEIN, AMINO ACID AND ALKALOID CONTENTS OF ANNUAL SWEET LUPIN (LUPINUS SPP. L.) FORAGES AND SEEDS GROWN IN ETHIOPIA

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  27 February 2012

LIKAWENT YEHEYIS*
Affiliation:
Amhara Region Agricultural Research Institute, Debre Birhan Centre, P.O. Box 112, Debre Birhan, Ethiopia Institute of Animal Science, Humboldt University of Berlin, Philippstr. 13, House 9, 10115 Berlin, Germany
C. KIJORA
Affiliation:
Institute of Animal Science, Humboldt University of Berlin, Philippstr. 13, House 9, 10115 Berlin, Germany
E. VAN SANTEN
Affiliation:
Department of Agronomy and Soils, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849-5412, USA
M. WINK
Affiliation:
Institute of Pharmacy and Molecular Biotechnology, Heidelberg University, Im Neuenheimer Feld 364, D-69120 Heidelberg, Germany
JÜRGEN DANIER
Affiliation:
Nutrition and Food Research Center, Technical University of Munich, Alte Akademie 10, D-85350 Freising, Germany
K. J. PETERS
Affiliation:
Institute of Animal Science, Humboldt University of Berlin, Philippstr. 13, House 9, 10115 Berlin, Germany
*
§Corresponding Author. Email: likawenty@yahoo.com

Summary

Though bitter white lupin (Lupinus albus L.) is a traditional crop in Ethiopia, sweet lupins are new to the country. As a result, the nutritional value of low-alkaloid lupins has not been evaluated under Ethiopian conditions. Crude protein, amino acid and alkaloid contents of 16 cultivars of three annual lupin species grown in four lupin growing locations (Merawi, Finoteselam, Kossober-1 and Kossober-2) of Ethiopia were evaluated. Location × cultivar interaction was a significant source of variation for all traits (p < 0.0001). In all locations, blue entries had either similar (p ≥ 0.0584) or higher (p ≤ 0.0235) forage crude protein content than the Local Landrace, white group and yellow entry. Compared with the Local Landrace, white and blue entries, the sole yellow entry had higher (p ≤ 0.0148) seed crude protein content at all locations except at Kossober-2, where it had similar (p = 0.8460) crude protein content as white entries. The Local Landrace had the highest forage and seed alkaloid contents. However, sweet blue Vitabor and Sanabor entries had the lowest forage and seed alkaloid contents, respectively. Low alkaloid and higher crude protein contents of sweet lupins grown in Ethiopia show the possibility to use sweet lupin forage and seeds as cheap home-grown protein source for livestock feed and human food in the country. However, for more reliable information, the laboratory results need to be verified by animal and human evaluations of the crop.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2012

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