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    This article has been cited by the following publications. This list is generated based on data provided by CrossRef.

    Hutton, D. H. W. 2008. Metadolerite age relationships in the dalradian of northwest donegal, Ireland and their orogenic significance. Geological Journal, Vol. 14, Issue. 2, p. 171.


    Hutton, D. H. W. 2007. Metadolerite age relationships in the Dalradian of northwest Donegal, Ireland and their orogenic significance. Geological Journal, Vol. 14, Issue. 1, p. 171.


    Varga, Robert J. Gee, Jeffrey S. Staudigel, Hubert and Tauxe, Lisa 1998. Dike surface lineations as magma flow indicators within the sheeted dike complex of the Troodos Ophiolite, Cyprus. Journal of Geophysical Research: Solid Earth, Vol. 103, Issue. B3, p. 5241.


    Jolly, R.J.H. and Sanderson, D.J. 1997. A Mohr circle construction for the opening of a pre-existing fracture. Journal of Structural Geology, Vol. 19, Issue. 6, p. 887.


    Jolly, R.J.H. and Sanderson, D.J. 1995. Variation in the form and distribution of dykes in the Mull swarm, Scotland. Journal of Structural Geology, Vol. 17, Issue. 11, p. 1543.


    McHONE, J. GREGORY 1988. Triassic-Jurassic Rifting - Continental Breakup and the Origin of the Atlantic Ocean and Passive Margins.


    VENKATAKRISHNAN, R. and LUTZ, R. 1988. Triassic-Jurassic Rifting - Continental Breakup and the Origin of the Atlantic Ocean and Passive Margins.


    Shelley, David 1985. Determining paleo-flow directions from groundmass fabrics in the Lyttelton radial dykes, New Zealand. Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research, Vol. 25, Issue. 1-2, p. 69.


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The intrusive form of some basalt dykes showing flow lineation

  • John L. Roberts (a1) and David J. Sanderson (a1)
  • DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0016756800056697
  • Published online: 01 May 2009
Abstract
Summary

The dilational intrusion is described of some basalt dykes of Tertiary age into the Easdale Slates at Easdale, Argyllshire. The intrusive form of the dykes results from the walls of irregular fractures, guided by pre-existing planes of weakness, moving apart under magma pressure. The propagation of the fractures is discussed in relation to the external stress field controlling the intrusion of the dykes and the direction of opening of the fractures considered in relation to the magma pressure and the external stress field. The flow lineations developed at the margins of the dykes are discussed in terms of their mode of origin. Although the attitude of these lineations varies with the intrusive form of the dykes, the overall direction of flow of the magma was upwards to the north of northwest.

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Geological Magazine
  • ISSN: 0016-7568
  • EISSN: 1469-5081
  • URL: /core/journals/geological-magazine
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