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Relationship of Influenza Vaccination Declination Statements and Influenza Vaccination Rates for Healthcare Workers in 22 US Hospitals

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 January 2015

Philip M. Polgreen*
Affiliation:
Department of Internal Medicine, University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, Iowa Departments of Epidemiology, University of Iowa College of Public Health, Iowa City, Iowa
Edward J. Septimus
Affiliation:
Methodist Hospital System, Houston, Texas
Michael F. Parry
Affiliation:
Stamford Hospital, Stamford, Connecticut
Susan E. Beekmann
Affiliation:
Department of Internal Medicine, University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, Iowa
Joseph E. Cavanaugh
Affiliation:
Department of Biostatistics, University of Iowa College of Public Health, Iowa City, Iowa
Arjun Srinivasan
Affiliation:
Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia
Thomas R. Talbot
Affiliation:
Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, Tennessee
*
University of Iowa Department of Internal Medicine, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, IA 52242 (philip-polgreen@uiowa.edu)

Abstract

The use of declination statements was associated with a mean increase of 11.6% in influenza vaccination rates among healthcare workers at 22 hospitals. In most hospitals, there were no negative consequences for healthcare workers who refused to sign the forms, and most policies were implemented along with other interventions designed to increase vaccination rates.

Type
Concise Communications
Copyright
Copyright © The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America 2008

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References

1. Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices, Smith, NM, Bresee, JS, et al. Prevention and control of influenza: recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP). MMWR Recomm Rep 2006;55(RR-10):142.Google Scholar
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