Skip to main content
×
Home

Distribution of Central Line-Associated Bloodstream Infections Determined From Washington State’s Annual Reporting Validation Program, 2009–2013

  • Jason M. Lempp (a1), M. Jeanne Cummings (a1) and David W. Birnbaum (a2)
Abstract

Healthcare-associated infection reporting validation is essential because this information is increasingly used in public healthcare quality assurances and care reimbursement. Washington State’s validation of central line-associated bloodstream infection reporting applies credible quality sciences methods to ensure that hospital reporting accuracy is maintained. This paper details findings and costs from our experience.

Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2017;38:489–492

Copyright
Corresponding author
Address correspondence to Jason M. Lempp, PO Box 33400, 10700 Meridian Ave N, Suite 100, Seattle, WA 98133 (JasonL@QualisHealth.org).
Footnotes
Hide All

PREVIOUS PRESENTATIONS: These findings were previously reported by J.M.L., M.J.C., and D.W.B. as a poster titled “Distribution of Central Line-Associated Bloodstream Infections Determined from Washington State’s Annual Reporting Validation Program, 2009–2013” at the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists (CSTE) Annual Conference in Nashville, Tennessee, on June 23, 2014, and by J.M.L., M.J.C., D.W.B., and P.G. Lovinger as a poster titled “Cost of a Sustainable Annual Validation Process to Ensure Credibility of State HAI Reporting” at the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists (CSTE) Annual Conference in Nashville, Tennessee, on June 23, 2014.

Footnotes
References
Hide All
1. Talbot TR, Bratzler DW, Carrico RM, et al. Public reporting of health care-associated surveillance data: recommendations from the Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee. Ann Intern Med 2013;159:631635.
2. Fortuna JA, Brenneman WA, Birnbaum D, Brown KL. The current state of validating the accuracy of clinical data reporting: lessons to be learned from quality and process improvement scientists. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2013;34:611614.
3. 2013 National and State Healthcare-Associated Infections Progress Report. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website. www.cdc.gov/hai/progress-report/index.html. Published January 14, 2015. Accessed November 25, 2016.
4. Washington State Department of Health. Healthcare Associated Infection Program group Administrator Instructions for Validation of Surveillance Programs, version 1.0. Document DOH 200-001. Olympia, WA: Washington State Department of Health; September 2010.
5. Stephen C. Capture-recapture methods in epidemiological studies. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 1996;17:262266.
6. Washington State Office of Financial Management. General Service Salary Schedule for Represented Employees. Olympia, WA: Washington State Human Resources; 2014. Accessed December 7, 2016. Available at: http://dop.wa.gov/CompClass/JobClassesSalaries/Pages/ClassifiedJobListing.aspx
7. Zarate R, Cummings J, Birnbaum D. A practical method to validate the accuracy of state-wide hospital infection surveillance. Abstract 842, Fifth Decennial International Conference on Healthcare-Associated Infections, Atlanta Georgia, March 2010.
8. Oh JY, Cunningham MC, Beldavs ZG, et al. Statewide validation of hospital-reported central line-associated bloodstream infections: Oregon, 2009. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2012;33:439445.
9. Backman LA, Melchreit R, Rodriguez R. Validation of the surveillance and reporting of central line-associated bloodstream infection data to a state health department. Am J Infect Control 2014;42:2833.
10. Rich KL, Reese SM, Bol KA, et al. Assessment of the quality of publicly reported central line-associated bloodstream infection data in Colorado, 2010. Am J Infect Control 2013;41:874879.
11. 2012 National and State Healthcare-Associated Infections Standardized Infection Ratio Report. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website. www.cdc.gov/hai/progress-report/index.html. Published March 29, 2012. Accessed November 25, 2016.
12. Kallen AJ, Patel PR, O’Grady NP. Preventing catheter-related bloodstream infections outside the intensive care unit: expanding prevention to new settings. Clin Infect Dis 2010;51:335341.
13. Climo M, Diekema D, Warren DK, et al. Prevalence of the use of central venous access devices within and outside of the intensive care unit: results of a survey among hospitals in the prevention epicenter program of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2003;24:942945.
14. Weber DJ, Sickbert-Bennett EE, Brown V, Rutala WA. Comparison of hospitalwide surveillance and targeted intensive care unit surveillance of healthcare-associated infections. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2007;28:13611366.
15. Davis J. Central-line-associated bloodstream infection: comprehensive, data-driven prevention. PA Patient Saf Advis 2011;8:100105.
Recommend this journal

Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this journal to your organisation's collection.

Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology
  • ISSN: 0899-823X
  • EISSN: 1559-6834
  • URL: /core/journals/infection-control-and-hospital-epidemiology
Please enter your name
Please enter a valid email address
Who would you like to send this to? *
×
Type Description Title
PDF
Supplementary Materials

Lempp supplementary material
Lempp supplementary material 1

 PDF (466 KB)
466 KB

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 8
Total number of PDF views: 57 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 983 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between 28th December 2016 - 22nd November 2017. This data will be updated every 24 hours.