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Subjective Wellbeing in ASEAN: A Cross-Country Study

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 November 2011

TAMBYAH SIOK KUAN
Affiliation:
Department of Marketing, NUS Business School, National University of Singapore, Singapore 119245biztsk@nus.edu.sg
TAN SOO JIUAN
Affiliation:
Department of Marketing, NUS Business School, National University of Singapore, Singapore 119245biztansj@nus.edu.sg

Abstract

Our paper reports and discusses issues relating to subjective wellbeing in selected countries in ASEAN (The Association of Southeast Asian Nations), a regional organization that coordinates and promotes the economic, social and cultural interests of member countries in Southeast Asia. Comparisons will be made across the five founding members of ASEAN, namely Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, Singapore and Thailand using data from the 2004, 2006 and 2007 AsiaBarometer Surveys. The indicators of subjective wellbeing used are perceptions of happiness, enjoyment, and achievement. We also examined the impact of selected demographic and non-demographic variables on these indicators.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2011

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References

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