Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

3558 Do Recognition, Behavioral Intentions, and Attitudes of Adolescent Relationship Abuse (ARA) Serve as Protective Factors Against Future ARA and Cyber Dating Abuse (CDA)?

  • Linden Wu (a1), Elizabeth A. Schlenk (a1), Susan M. Sereika (a1) and Elizabeth Miller (a1)

Abstract

OBJECTIVES/SPECIFIC AIMS: To create prevention strategies targeting ARA and CDA, it is critical to educate and mold adolescent recognition, behavioral intentions, and attitudes regarding healthy dating relationships. Thus, the purpose of this study was to examine if high school students’ recognition of ARA, the students’ behavioral intentional to intervene during ARA episode of someone they know, and the students’ attitudes about the importance of healthy relationship serve as a protective factors against experiencing ARA. Aim 1: Do baseline (T1) recognition, behavioral intentions, and attitudes serve as protective factors against experiencing ARA in high school students at 3-month follow-up (T2)? Aim 2: Do baseline (T1) recognition, behavioral intentions, and attitudes serve as protective factors against CDA in high school students at 3-month follow- up (T2)? METHODS/STUDY POPULATION: To examine the relationships between recognition, behavioral intentions, and attitudes of ARA and CDA, a secondary analysis using a descriptive correlational design was used to analyze electronic survey data from a large randomized controlled parent study. The parent study consisted of 1,011 high school students ages 14 to 19 years who sought health service through one of eight school-based health clinics in California. This secondary analysis consisted of 819 students, with 640 (78.1%) female, 178 (21.7%) males, and 1 (0.2%) transgender participant. There were 42 (5.1%) Caucasians, 141 (17.2%) Asians, 218 (26.7%) African Americans, 313 (38.2%) Hispanics, 42 (5.1%) American Indians/Alaskan Natives, and 63 (7.7%) students who responded multi-racial. To measure recognition of ARA, a 10-item, 5-point Likert scale was used with responses ranging from 1=“not abusive” to 5=“extremely abusive” (Cronbach’s a = 0.85). To assess behavioral intentions to intervene, a 5-item, 5-point Likert scale was used to ask participants how likely they would be to stop the ARA behavior if they witness a peer perpetrating ARA with responses ranging from 1=“very unlikely” to 5=“very likely” (Cronbach’s a = 0.89). A 6-item, 3-point Likert healthy relationship tool measured participants’ attitudes regarding healthy relationship with responses ranging from 1=“not important” to 3=“very important”. Both ARA and CDA were assessed using a “yes/no” response choice for the lastthree months. To account for the hierarchical nature of the data analysis, a binary logistic regression was used in SPSS 24. To take into account the clustering coefficients of the eight different school clinics and as well as the parent study’s intervention and control groups, these clusters were examined as co-variates. Sex, race, and age were included as covariates, also. RESULTS/ANTICIPATED RESULTS: The relationship status of high school students consisted of 262 (32.0%) who were single, 97 (11.8%) who were going out, dating, or hooking up with more than one person, 423 (51.7%) who were seriously dating one person, and 37 (4.5%) who were not sure. At 3-month follow-up assessment, 111 (13.6%) of high school students experienced ARA, and 476 (58.1%) experienced CDA. The mean recognition of ARA score was 3.90 + 0.67, mean behavioral intentions score was 4.00 + 0.83, and mean attitudes score was 2.54 + 0.37. When examining the full ARA model including all three predicators controlling for the demographics and group assignment, none of the predictor variables were significant (p>0.05) in predicting ARA in high school students. Also, all three predictors were not significant in predicting ARA in the main effects model. When examining the full CDA model, with no interaction, all three predictors were significant. Recognition had 0.784 decrease odds (95% CI = 0633-0.971, p = 0.026) of predicting CDA. However the odds of CDA increase non-linearly up to the mean (2.537709) for the attitudes variable after which the odds then decreases non-linearly. The odds of CDA is increasing non-linearly up to 3.073913 for the behavioral intention variable after which the odds then decrease non-linearly. DISCUSSION/SIGNIFICANCE OF IMPACT: Adolescence is typically a time of exploration, transition, and social development. Researchers should investigate the efficacy of ARA and CDA prevention programs that focus on recognition, behavioral intentions, and attitudes to educate adolescents on healthy relationships. Results showed that behavioral intention to intervene and attitudes about healthy relationship can serve as protective factors against CDA. From our data, more students experienced CDA compared to ARA. Thus, it may by useful to recognize the use of technology as a social force within the adolescent culture in defining adolescents’ experiences of healthy relationships and potential experience of CDA.

    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      3558 Do Recognition, Behavioral Intentions, and Attitudes of Adolescent Relationship Abuse (ARA) Serve as Protective Factors Against Future ARA and Cyber Dating Abuse (CDA)?
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      3558 Do Recognition, Behavioral Intentions, and Attitudes of Adolescent Relationship Abuse (ARA) Serve as Protective Factors Against Future ARA and Cyber Dating Abuse (CDA)?
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      3558 Do Recognition, Behavioral Intentions, and Attitudes of Adolescent Relationship Abuse (ARA) Serve as Protective Factors Against Future ARA and Cyber Dating Abuse (CDA)?
      Available formats
      ×

Copyright

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-ncnd/4.0/), which permits non-commercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is unaltered and is properly cited. The written permission of Cambridge University Press must be obtained for commercial re-use or in order to create a derivative work.

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed