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Immunomodulatory effects of dietary whey proteins in mice

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 June 2009

Chun W. Wong
Affiliation:
CSIRO Division of Animal Health, Armidale, NSW 2350, Australia
Dennis L. Watson
Affiliation:
CSIRO Division of Animal Health, Armidale, NSW 2350, Australia

Summary

Studies on the immunomodulatory properties of dietary whey proteins in mice are reported. Ingestion of bovine milk whey proteins, either as a supplement in an adequately balanced commercial diet or as the only protein source in a balanced diet, consistently enhanced secondary humoral antibody responses following systemic immunization with ovalbumin, when compared with other protein sources such as soyabean protein isolate and ovine colostral whey proteins. After 5–8 weeks of feeding, dietary milk whey proteins enhanced cell-mediated immune responses as revealed by footpad delayed-type hypersensitivity responses, and concanavalin A-induced spleen cell proliferative responses. To monitor nutritional effects of milk whey proteins, live weight, leucocyte counts and clinical changes of diet-fed mice were examined. The present results confirm other previous results that dietary bovine milk whey proteins have immunoenhancing properties in mice and these properties are unlikely to be related solely to the nutritional effects.

Type
Original Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Proprietors of Journal of Dairy Research 1995

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References

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